The Impacts Of Humanism: Socrates, Plato And Aristotle

Decent Essays
Kendra Rivera
Professor Mulholland
Greek and Roman Humanities
December 3, 2014
Humanism was a concept that led to many impacts on other philosophy and philosophers ways of thinking. Humanism is known as a concept or philosophy that gave a major importance to the human being, rather then the supernatural, gods or the divine. Humanism focused completely on the welfare of humans and this introduced a complete different way of thinking to everyone because they were so use to focusing on others such as the gods and hierarchy that this gave people a different approach on how to live life. This philosophy was also known as the Renaissance Culture Movement that gave life back to the Roman and Greek thought. Some philosophers well known through this period of time are Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. Humanism impacted their way of thinking and each one had a unique impact and outcome to this new philosophy.
Also, humanism gives the human the ability
…show more content…
Another way to explain this concept is, “In ' stead, humanism emphasizes human abilities in a human world—that is, humanism affirms each person 's ability to live a rewarding and satisfying life on earth without metaphysical control or supernatural support” (Milam 20). To begin with, Socrates a Greek philosopher who we only have information about through his pupils such as Plato, was not known for being a “humanist” but just had some elements portrayed in his philosophy. Although Socrates is known for his teaching he never went out to lecture he taught people by asking questions in order for once to reach self-truth. Michael C. Milam in the article “Humanism Paradox of Politics” expresses, “Socrates "taught" his students by "mid ' wifery"—that is, by continually asking questions in order to help each student to clarify his own ideas, abilities, and proclivities”. Midwife is an analogy that Socrates used to describe him as someone who helps find knowledge. By this kind of teaching Socrates

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