Major Depressive Disorder Case Study

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Major Depressive Disorder Major depressive disorder is a mood disorder that is caused by extreme and repetitious feelings of desperation, worthlessness, and discouragement. Most of these feelings are known to cause impaired emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and physical functioning or performance. (NEED CITATION) Major or clinical depression is commonly diagnosed with those who have the symptoms every day for at least two weeks. DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual) is a common tool used to diagnose mental health conditions in patients thought to have depression. A few symptoms of depression are: fatigue, loss of energy, feelings of worthlessness, emptiness, sadness, negativity, and anxiety. Those who are diagnosed may also have a …show more content…
The patient will be asked questions about their feelings and behavior, which will help determine whether they have a major depressive disorder. The DSM-5 will also help determine if MDD is present in the patient. There must be 5 or more symptoms, experienced for more than 2 weeks, for the patient to be diagnosed with MDD. Legg, T.J. (2015, January 21). Major Depressive Disorder (Clinical Depression). Healthline. There are many factors that can trigger major depression, such as: losing a loved one through death, separation or divorce, social isolation, stress, major life changes, conflicts in relationships or friendships, bullying, and physical, emotional, or sexual abuse. Drug or alcohol abuse can also trigger major depression. (Goldberg, 2016). Hypothyroidism, cancer, and other medical conditions have also been known to trigger MDD. (Legg, …show more content…
Many of these symptoms are used to diagnose depression in adults, which reveals more symptoms that weren’t found in the beginning of the diagnosis. (Son & Kirchner, 2000). Dysthymic Disorder, also known as Persistent Depressive Disorder, is like MDD, although MDD has more severe symptoms. Dysthymic disorder can severely impair a child’s development of the social skills needed to combat these symptoms. MDD episodes are known to last 7-9 months, and dysthymic disorder episodes are known to last 3 years. 90% of children with MDD reach remission by 18 months to 2 years after being diagnosed. Children with dysthymic disorder are still struggling with their symptoms at this point. (Son & Kirchner, 2000). In MDD, 40% to 70% of patients have psychiatric disorders. After children recover from MDD, they are known to show low self-esteem, damaged relationships with others, increased risk of smoking and early pregnancy, and faint depressive symptoms. There are a few conditions that are known to cause MDD, such as: Hypokalemia, Hyponatremia, Electrolyte abnormality, Alcohol or Drug abuse/ withdrawal, oral contraceptives, Anemia, and Wilson’s Disease. (Son & Kirchner,

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