Analysis Of Mahatma Gandhi's Nonviolence Movement

Good Essays
Mahatma Gandhi brought freedom to India by introducing his own politics thoughts that he has once created. Throughout his beloved speech, Gandhi established many responses to the British government for the freedom that India deserves. Gandhi quickly became a spiritual and political leader in the late 20th century. He then expanded and supported his own political party of the nonviolence movement that many Indians participated in. His movement was strongly affected by the British government, since the British was upset on India’s political right. Many Indians supported Gandhi throughout his works of sustaining freedom for the country. This movement, however was created to witness the Indians gaining their full independence. The protesters grew …show more content…
Gandhi never looked forward in violence and instead he just wanted to be a respectful, humble, peaceful leader. He was comfortable with the meaning of nonviolence therefore he made the nonviolence movement which concludes the British from attacking innocent people from India. As Gandhi made this specific movement, he saved many Indian lives as the British attacks were still in active. Historians believed that Gandhi’s movement is what stops the British and acknowledges the understanding of freedom from the Indian society. Freedom played a huge role in modern India, especially the understanding many Indians living in unhealthy environments. Gandhi was of course well intrigued by the understanding of many Indians, and therefore protested the British monopoly on salt. That allows Gandhi to gain full independence for India on March 12th, 1930. Gaining full independence allows Gandhi to increase India’s economic powers and wealthy interactions from the allowance of the congress party. He accomplished for India as a country gaining full independence and for Indians to share the same equality rights. Gandhi impacted the british sensationally due to the lack of his own conventional movements and the support from Indians that strive to victory. His brave internship is what led to this victory among the Indians that joined the nonviolence movement. Joining the nonviolence …show more content…
The caste system goes by five individual tiers: Brahmin (priests), Kshatriya (warriors), Vaishya (merchants), Sudra (peasants), and Untouchables (street sweepers). The caste system shows the importance of the roles in the occurrence of many events that Gandhi has created and also shows how each group should be trained as a way of knowing their social lives. Gandhi struggled on managing the organization of the caste system due to the idea of the India’s constitution that bans the basis of the caste system. Most of the Historians supported and believed the caste system was ideally respected and full aware taken control by Gandhi. The British government was well aware of the caste system that Gandhi supported; so the British took governmental actions against this system to ensure that the Indians won’t have a respected organization and for Gandhi to change the local community. However the strength of Mahatma Gandhi and the protesters that were against the British, brought attention to the society of the British and its army. The British happened to be annoyed due to the protesters and the Gandhi revolution and they successfully stopped the British from forcing Indians to have no freedom for themselves. Gandhi was able to manage India to be free from the British government and the Indian society supported Gandhi

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Hindu Nationalism In India

    • 1023 Words
    • 5 Pages

    In the 1920s, the Hindu nationalist movement gained support amongst Hindus of the lower castes who felt oppressed by the ruling Hindu elite and desired a return to India’s “pure roots.” Certain Hindu groups including the Sangh Parivar, emerged as a result of British control in India and oppression from elite Hindus, who were controlling the lives of many in India. Hindu nationalism eventually formed into both a political and cultural movement that became defined in terms of Hindu religious values. In fact, Hindu nationalist received so much support that India’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) identified the movement as “not just a religion, but a way of life for the average citizen.” This, however, created much controversy especially amongst Indians who identified themselves as Muslim, Sikh, or Christian, and became oppressed in Indian…

    • 1023 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The man of nonviolent resistance, Mohandas K. Gandhi once said “‘Civil disobedience, is the inherent right of a citizen.... Above all, [it] must have no ill will or hatred behind it” (Contemporary Heroes and Heroines). Meaning it is one’s free will that makes them able to be civil disobedient. This is shown through the character Antigone in the play Antigone by Sophocles. Also through one of history’s most influential people Mohandas K. Gandhi of India.…

    • 1128 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, also affectionately known as Mahatma Gandhi which implies “great soul”, is widely recognized as the father of Indian nation and one of the greatest political and spiritual leaders of all time. Mahatma Gandhi led India to independence by pioneering and employing nonviolent civil disobedience, and inspired civil rights movement all around the world. Mahatma Gandhi first became a lawyer after receiving education in England. Being prone to change and tolerant of all people, Gandhi transformed into the essential leader in India’s independence movement by challenging the British empire not with war and violence, but with nonviolent resistance and peaceful protests. Gandhi became the Mahatma we know by achieving progress…

    • 768 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Indians do not have to obey British’s laws and to not respect them. Thoreau guided his people to not pay British taxes, especially salt’s tax. The idea of “civil disobedience” belongs to Thoreau. Henry David Thoreau’s ideas had an important role of the India’s history. Mahatma Gandhi was inspired by him very much.…

    • 1110 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Ironically, the British insistence on classification reflected in part a desire for data on which to base early forms of affirmative action thereby curing the problem that at least according to Middleton, Ghurye, and others the British were in part themselves creating. Like many later analysts, Ghurye noted that one obvious result of the census was a proliferation of caste associations aiming to change their levels in the hierarchy: aboriginals seeking classification as Hindus, Sikhs worried about under counting, Kolis claiming to be Koli Rajputs, and so on. Critique: In Caste and Race he nowhere reports for his readers his own caste, and even his autobiography mentions only that he avoided the new caste-advancement associations on grounds of principle. But by identifying those associations, he indirectly but surely quite consciously…

    • 1791 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However ; Patel invoked the patriortism of India’s monarchs , asking them to join the freedom of their states . He consolidated the small kingdoms and with great wixdom tackled the Nizam of Hyderabad and the Nawab of Junagarh who initially didn’t want to join India. His great efforts of uniting India brought success. He helped in joining a scattered nation without much bloodshed. Due to his such efforts he got the title of “IRON MAN “.…

    • 701 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    While “The meeting was a disappointment… British leaders had acknowledged him as a force they could not suppress or ignore” (Staff Writer). This acknowledgement empowered the citizens of India, and fueled the wholly nonviolent movement all the way to its end. Through the many pitfalls that came alongside the dissidence, the acknowledgement of the nonviolent independent movement caused partially by Mahatma Gandhi helped win the Indian people their own autonomy. That was the pebble that was thrown into a lake, causing a ripple effect. One of many beginnings to a single end, “India’s independence was finally granted in August 1947”.…

    • 1097 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    British Imperialism

    • 1710 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The Indian rulers were at cross hairs about the system of government and the system through which the country could be governed. Consequently, a number of leaders were constantly in dispute making the system even weak. Therefore, the British saw it as a tool they could use to infiltrate the country and exploit the resources for the development of its own economy and the industrial sector. On the other hand, mistrust among the Indian leaders led to the growth of trust in the British enforcement and systems of leadership. Therefore, the British got a strong support from the Indians who saw British leadership as the only solution for the issues in the country.…

    • 1710 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Kipling’s childhood was no stranger to imperialistic manners as he grew up in British occupied India. The White Man’s Burden was a poem simply describing Kipling's personal feelings and opinions about the nature of imperialism directed toward the U.S. people. The concept of imperialism had existed for centuries as a way to justify overtaking defenseless states. Although Kipling’s the White Man’s Burden fueled the fire of harsh imperialistic reins while inflicting hardship on suffering citizens, imperialism had a necessary place in history crucial for the advancement of humanity. According to the demeanor of the poem, Kipling's view of imperialistic practices are strong and evident.…

    • 978 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Gandhi Rhetorical Analysis

    • 1008 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Gandhi had established concise and persuasive concept of freedom from the utilization of ethos, pathos, logos, and other rhetorical devices fashioning a more solid argument. At first glance, the use of ethos within Gandhi 's letter conveys how properly the letter spoke to the people of India and to the British rule; this is due to his own morals and non-violent tendencies. Gandhi was then able to sway a large majority of Indians to stand with him. Raised by Hindu parents Gandhi was heavily influenced by Jainism. The Jains believe in Ahimsa, which is refraining from non-violent tendencies including physical, mental, or verbal, aggression.…

    • 1008 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays