Madame Bovary And The Awakening Analysis

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Many authors utilize books to convey problems with society. More talented authors such as Gustave Flaubert and Kate Chopin address their perspectives creatively through the life of a character, Emma and Edna. These authors both impart their perspective on the topic of women’s rights in the books Madame Bovary and The Awakening. Although it is their diverse tone in which both argue their positive or negative ideas for letting women have the ability to choose. Gustave uses his tone to show how absurd and reckless the world would be, whereas Chopin explains, given the chance women would live simply, such as an average house-wife. Their tone is essential to understanding their feelings of the flawed or unflawed society. Flaubert, a man, has the unshakeable opinion, that if women were given the opportunity to decide for themselves, the results would be catastrophic. His opinion is decisive and bold, yet this hardly could be understood without his assertive tone. His tone could also be described as dreary, apathetic, somber, detached, or impersonal, yet with all this negativity the reader can hardly disagree. In most cases this tone could possibly have an …show more content…
In effect for these tragic series of events there is now left wanting, a young orphaned girl, Berthe. There was little compassion for Emma that originated but now looking upon the ripple effect of her actions, there is no sympathy left. It is clear Flaubert shaped Emma in this particular way for a certain purpose. The structure of tone utilized creating all of these negative hateful feelings reinforce his original desire, which is to prove how women should be left under watch of a man’s eyes. He uses Emma as an example to exemplify, how if given the chance women would ultimately cause chaos and societal

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