Macromolecules In Biology

1017 Words 5 Pages
Nutrition is a specialization in biology that examines how nutrients are digested, broken down, absorbed, and used in the body. Foods are composed of nutrients. Nutrients are chemical substances essential for survival because they provide energy and raw materials and support body processes such as growth, maintenance, or repair of tissues. These nutrients include Carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins which are three macromolecules that play important roles in nutrition and digestion. There are two types of Carbohydrates, simple and complex. Carbohydrates are commonly called sugars and provide the major source of fuel to power the animal body, especially the nervous system. This type of carbohydrate contains one or two sugar units bonded together. …show more content…
An animal's dry weight consists mainly of protein. Skin, hair, connective tissues, bone, and muscle are mainly constructed from structural forms of proteins. When it comes to carbohydrates, one of the main key sources of Carbohydrates is plants. Herbivores obtain carbohydrates through fruits, seeds, stems, leaves, and roots. Humans obtain carbohydrates through fruit juices, starches from potatoes, and breads made from wheat, corn, and rice seeds. The role and functions of carbohydrates are to provide energy for working muscles and fuel for the central nervous system; be the body’s main source of fuel for physical activity, brain function, and organs; enable fat metabolism; and prevent protein from being used as. All the cells and tissues in the body need carbohydrates because they are important for intestinal health and waste elimination. Foods containing carbohydrate are in the grains, fruit, and milk groups. Vegetables have a small amount of carbohydrate. After carbohydrates are eaten, they are broken down into smaller units of in the stomach and small …show more content…
Children who have the infantile form usually die within a year, but children and adults who develop the disease later in life may survive for many years. In Gaucher’s disease, glucocerebrosides accumulate in tissues. Gaucher’s disease is the most common lipidosis. Gaucher’s disease leads to an enlarged liver and spleen and a brownish pigmentation of the skin. Accumulations of glucocerebrosides in the eyes cause yellow spots called pingueculae to appear. Accumulations in the bone marrow can cause pain and destroy bone. Major signs and symptoms include enlargement of the liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly), a low number of red blood cells (anemia), easy bruising caused by a decrease in blood platelets (thrombocytopenia), lung disease, and bone abnormalities such as bone pain, fractures, and arthritis. As for protein, insects and other invertebrates are good sources. The dry weight of grasshoppers consists of roughly 50 to 75 percent protein, which forms a large part of the rigid exoskeleton. Insects are a highly digestible source of food for many small mammals. Also, the egg white, or albumin, serves as a source of protein for development of the chick

Related Documents