Mackenzie King's Analysis

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Mackenzie King helped Canada break free of Britain’s reins as Canada’s Government wanted to have a new national identity without being linked to the United Kingdom. Although Canada had gained independence in 1867, Canada was ruled by the commonwealth and was unable to make its own decisions until, Mackenzie King decided to do things differently when it came to World War II. Due to Canada having good relations internally with the minority (French Canadians), it changed the way people viewed Canada as a whole as they were seen as more of a diverse and democratic country. During World War II, Mackenzie King was instrumental in helping Canada receive their national identity. Even though Canada was considered it’s own nation, British rule was …show more content…
At the time, it was the first time that the country had really taken a stand for itself and made their own declaration of war as a sovereign nation. Canada did not want to be associated and known as ‘a colony created by the U.K’ but, instead it wants to be known as a nation that is it’s own and that can defend itself. In 1939, Canada made an agreement with Britain called the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan also known as the BCATP, which was supposed to train Canadian aircrew. Mackenzie King decided that people that were apart of this organization should be known as members of ‘The Royal Canadian Airforce’. The agreement “…was a major Canadian contribution to Allied air superiority in World War II, and lasted until 31 March 1945…,” This statement proves that Canada is …show more content…
Adding on, when World War II began Mackenzie King promised French Canadians that he would not impose conscription in 1940. During this time he was strictly against conscription as “Mackenzie King repeated his pledge to Parliament, that there would be no overseas service,…” (Ciment 814) This quote proves that by supporting the idea of no conscription it helped Mackenzie King portray Canada as a united and strong nation, internally and externally. It would not only gave the nation the identity of officially being a unified country but, now that he had settled issues with the French Canadians, he was able to show the other countries that he had solved internal problems and that we had a united forefront. It later led to Mackenzie King signing “the United Nations Charter on behalf of Canada” which would benefit the country even more in the future. Also, he valued the French Canadians a lot compared to other leaders like R. Bennet. He wanted to make sure that they had equal rights and that their voices were heard. In his diary, he writes, “I said to him it seemed to me it was his duty to consider what the French Canadians would wish him to do in the circumstances.” (Diary, January 31, 1942) This proves that he values everyone’s opinion in Canada as they are apart of this country. Although many politicians didn’t like the French Canadians as they were

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