Macbeth Is Responsible For His Own Downfall Essay

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Despite the considerable number of influences Macbeth had, Macbeth is responsible for his own downfall. In William Shakespeare’s play ‘Macbeth’, Macbeth who also is the central character, is a tragic hero who is known for being the most courageous and noble person. Yet, Macbeth eventually destroys himself with his selfish ambitions and desires and unfortunately turns into a cold-blooded king who will slaughter anyone that becomes a risk to his kingdom. In the play, Shakespeare develops the plot in a way that points out how Macbeth turned out to be the cause of his own death. Macbeth is responsible for his own death as he intentionally acted upon influences from the witches, Lady Macbeth and always chose the wrong from the right as his ambitions …show more content…
Hail to thee, Thane of Glamis! All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, Thane of Cawdor! All hail, Macbeth, that shalt be king hereafter!” (Shakespeare 15). The witches told Macbeth that he will be the Thane of Cawdor then become the Thane of Glamis and then eventually he will become the next King. Banquo did not trust or believe in the three witches and their prophecy while Macbeth did. Even though the three witches somewhat had a role in Macbeth’s downfall, they are not responsible for what Macbeth did. That is, the witches never told Macbeth to murder King Duncan, yet, their prophecy may have given him the idea of it for him to take over the throne. Therefore, the three witches are not the most responsible for Macbeth’s fall, yet their prophecy did play a role into leading him to do the immoral actions he …show more content…
In all of them Macbeth chose the wrong path. Instead of listening to his conscience, he listened to his ambitions and that dictated his moral reasoning and hence, prevented him from doing the good. In the beginning of the play, he could have ignored the witches, but the idea of becoming the next King made him anxious to know if it would really happen. After one of the prophecies being fulfilled, he thought that every other one would be true too, so he wanted to make that happen earlier. He had two options presented to him when Lady Macbeth suggested him to kill Duncan; unfortunately, he chose the wrong path again. After killing Duncan, he became even more courageous and dangerous. He murdered the two guards, Banquo and MacDuff’s family as well. He became so courageous that he believed that “none of woman born shall harm” him (Shakespeare 115). His disrespectful character shines light unto his stubbornness and the fact that he would do anything to get what he

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