Macbeth Ambition Analysis

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Without ambition many of man 's greatest achievement would not be possible simply because of the fact that nobody would seek to create opportunities, discover, or go against other and the masses of people and succeed. Although the human race pushes that the feeling of ambition is necessary and rewarding in life, it is vitally important to acknowledge that overpowering ambition leads to mankind 's greatest downfall, and if not used correctly, one can experience loss from this. In Shakespeare 's “Macbeth”, ambition plays as one of the most important themes, also as a ruthless motivation that urges Macbeth 's cruel nature and eventually turns him into a bloodthirsty monster. In this play, there is a tremendous display of contradiction and ambition …show more content…
R. Foakes notes Macbeth 's spur of thoughts in "A. Images of Death: Ambition in Macbeth", when he adds, "While Banquo prudently dismisses the prophecy as a temptation to "win us to our harm" (123), Macbeth is unable to control the ever swelling flow of ambitious thoughts, experiencing, for s time at least, an acute dilemma" (Foakes 226). Foakes statement analyzes that Macbeth suffers from over thinking, constantly fighting and questioning himself. One example of this is when Macbeth speaks to himself upon the fact that Macbeth is fit for the job and there is no reason to kill him, but Macbeth just wants the power to himself. "I have no spur/ To prick the sides of my intent, but only/ Vaulting ambition, which o 'erleaps itself/ And falls on the other--" (Shakespeare I.7.25-28). Macbeth, perfectly honest, admits that Duncan is a great king and is good for Scotland. But due to the surplus of thoughts, ignited by the prophecies, he tampers with this idea of becoming king. These thoughts of ambition lead to the murder of Duncan, which will start his reign of terror and madness, resulting in his …show more content…
Not only does he display characteristics of an eager leader and a great warrior (along many others), but most importantly, an ambitious character. Piotr Sadowski feels the same when reflecting upon the characteristics of Macbeth in "The Masculine in Macbeth", when talking about Macbeth and states, "The partial confirmation of the prophecy is for eager and ambitious Macbeth a proof of its veracity, but for the prudent and cautious Banquo it is a warning of the Devil 's trap: "Often sometimes, to win us to our harm,/ The instrument of darkness tell us truths;/ win us with the honest trifles, to betray 's/ In the deepest consequence" (123-126)(Sadowski 232). Here, Sadowski refers to Macbeth as a eager and ambitious one, and as read in the book this is proven very clear. "Besides, this Duncan/ Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been/ So clear in his great office, that his virtues/ Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against/ The deep damnation of his taking-off" (Shakespeare I.7.16-20). Macbeth rants over and over about how he wants power so badly, and here, Macbeth expresses that. He admits that Duncan 's has done a good job being king, but his characteristics, specifically ambition, do not stop him from taking over this

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