Lynette Yiadom-Boakye Analysis

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Similar to Naomi Beckwith, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye also has multiple identities pertaining to her occupation as an artist: she is both a female artist and an artist of colored race. She was born in London in 1977 with her parents being two nurses that came to Britain from Ghana (Cooke). She studied a foundation course at Central St Martins, and obtained her degree at Falmouth College of Art and her master degree at the the Royal Academy Schools (Wright). She did a variety of job to support her artistic life before she became famous. After she received different awards and distinctions such as Turner prize nomination and the Pinchuk Foundation Future Generation Art Prize 2012 (Wright), she was finally able to work as a full-time artist (Cooke). …show more content…
At the same time, as the curator of Yiadom-Boakye’s very first solo exhibition, Naomi Beckwith showed her remarkable ability to spot new rising artist. As Lawrence Alloway writes in the article “The Great Curatorial Dim-Out,” some of the pressures a curator would encounter are “taste expectations emanating from the trustees and director” (224), and “taste expectations of other members of the curator’s peer group” (224). Beckwith definitely manages the first pressures by curating Yiadom-Boakye’s very first solo exhibition at The Studio Museum in Harlem, and also manages the second pressure by having her peers recognize her achievement to successfully pick future rising star artists like Yiadom-Boakye. Artspace editor-in-chief Andrew M. Goldstein even interviewed her in his article “MCA Chicago Curator Naomi Beckwith on How to Spot Rising Stars,” which incorporate artists Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Sanford Biggers, Xaviera Simmons and Rashid Johnson as example to proves Beckwith’s remarkable taste of future rising …show more content…
Unlike her previous approaches to organize exhibitions, Naomi Beckwith took an extraordinary approach in this show. As discussed in Jason Farago’s article “The Freedom Principle review – an astounding fusion of jazz and art,” this exhibition “shows how the themes of black cultural nationalism in the 1960s – an art engaged with political struggle, and unafraid to speak in a collective voice – continued a modernist artistic tradition of merging art into daily

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