Symbolism In Edgar Allen Poe's The Raven

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“The Raven” is a poem expressed in the form of a story that the author, Edgar Allen Poe, uses an amazing combination of symbolism, imagery, and wordplay to display the love and supernatural aspect that correlates to the deaf of the man’s love, Lenore. These elements help support the theme. The theme of “The Raven” is the sadness and grief that is brought along when a love one is lost eternalized and can never be fixed. The symbols are in the form of objects and figures. The imagery in the poem sculpts the scene and the emotion that is being portrayed. The wordplay holds a deeper meaning to behind it which helps proves the theme of grieving.
Symbolism is greatly used throughout the poem. It’s a key element in the poem, it helps give a deeper
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Another symbol is the “Night’s Plutonian shore,” this is a serious negative aspect that represents death. “Plutonian” is an allusion to Greek mythology, it references to the god of the dead, ruler of the underworld, Haiti, etc. “Night” is usually a symbol to emptiness and death, and combined with shore, the idea of the ocean, Greek god of the dead is Pluto, ergo, the metaphorical shore is the underworld. Poe tries to give as many examples of death throughout the poem without blatantly saying the word. The Bust of Pallas is another symbol used in the poem, this alludes to the Greek god of Pallas Athena, the god of wisdom. So when the raven flew in the room and landed on the statue, and started repeating the phrase “nevermore” it comes off as wisdom, whenever asked about Lenore, the raven judiciously responds with that phrase, and it doesn’t seem condescending. Imagery is another focal point of the poem; it creates the tone of unsure terror and horror that will occur. “Silken, sad, uncertain…felt before,” these lines determine the setting, with this imagery the not only is it apparent that the narrator is descriptive but from the text its obvious that the narrator is thrilled – he is excited by the paranormal activities. “And his eyes… on the floor,” the narrator is haunted by the features of the raven, it almost seem demonic. From this imagery the reader can comprehend from the text that the bird and the narrator are

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