Lotus Sutra Buddhism Analysis

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Both the Lotus Sutra and the Zen teachings of Master Lin-Chi are texts that define what it means to practice Buddhism. One would think two books over one doctrine would be very similar in their prescriptions, but this is not the case. The Lotus Sutra is presented as a discourse delivered by the Buddha towards the end of his life, featuring many sutras on processes to gain enlightenment. The Zen teachings feature Master Lin Chi and were writing in 810 to 866 AD, during the Tang Dynasty and focus more on immediate enlightenment over doctrinal concerns. Both texts feature paths of enlightenment than can be compare from their main tenets and ideas.
When comparing both the Lotus Sutra and the Zen teachings of Master Lin-Chi one can find for the
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In the Sutra there are three vehicles. The first vehicle to arrive at Nirvana is to hear the Buddha’s teachings. This essentially means to sit at the teacher’s feet and let him guide you into enlightenment. The second vehicle requires that a person realize enlightenment on their own, through their own respective ideologies. The third vehicle is the path of the Bodhisattva. The Bodhisattva intentionally remains in the cycle of rebirth in order to assist others in achieving Nirvana. All three of those vehicles are one vehicle, according to the …show more content…
In Chapter 3 of the Lotus Sutra, there is a parable of a Burning House which goes like so: A wise man returns from his travels to his mansion on fire and his children are trapped inside. He tells them the house is on fire and tells them to come out, but they do not understand what "the house is on fire" means, and they are immersed with their playthings. So the father tells them that he has presents outside like goat carts, deer carts or bullock carts for the various sons. The children then hurry to come out and ask for the carts, but the father does not have them. Instead, he gives each child a far better gift than they could have imagined, drawn by white

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