Lost Cause Analysis

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“Lost Cause” advocates in the South, despite saying otherwise, promoted a political message about the Confederacy because “Lost Cause” advocates tried to portray a glorified image of the Confederacy to all people to ensure that the causes fought for in the Civil War remained supported. The “Lost Cause” of the South was limited because the movement appeared elitist to many people. The main influence of the “Lost Cause” was that it ensured racist sentiments towards African Americans would continue in the South and slavery would continue to be viewed as a positive good.

“Lost Cause” advocates in the South promoted a political message about the Confederacy by painting a glorified image of the Confederacy to many Americans in an attempt to keep
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Lee and the Confederacy as well as get others to honor Robert E. Lee and the Confederacy, which demonstrated how “Lost Cause” advocates glorified the Confederacy and raised support for Confederate ideals. Since the postcard was made to be sent to anyone in America and to be viewed by anyone in America, it is likely that the postcard maker’s goal was to promote the political message of the Confederacy being better than the current United States and a glorious “Lost Cause” (1). An excerpt from the United Daughters of the Confederacy Constitution proved that the goals of the organization were to safeguard the history of the Confederacy and spread information of the Confederacy to the future generations of the South. Since the Organization is pro-Confederate and located in the South, it is likely that the UDC was biased about what the true history of the Civil War was and wanted to spread a biased pro-Confederate message about the glory of the Confederacy to the …show more content…
Documents 5 and 6 were similar in subject matter, namely, the roles of blacks in the South. A 1923 textbook that was written by Matthew Andrews and promoted by “Lost Cause” advocates in the South claimed that African Americans were savages of an inferior race. The textbook also claimed that slaveholders were morally uplifting to slaves. Since the textbook was popular at schools for decades, it is likely that the racist ideas expressed in the book influenced many Southerners (5). Susie King Taylor proved that many ex-Confederate Daughters wanted to prohibit “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” from theaters because it exaggerated the treatment of slaves and created a bad image of slavery, which demonstrated how ex-Confederate Daughters wanted a positive image of slavery. Since Susie King Taylor attacked the institution of slavery, it was likely that she was a former abolitionist as well as pro-union, and therefore would be biased in her views about the ex-Confederate Daughters (6). It would be useful to analyze a diary of an African American living in the South because such a document could prove how effective “Lost Cause” advocates were at ensuring racist sentiments towards African Americans continued in the South. “Lost Cause” advocates in the South ensured that racist sentiments towards African Americans

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