Comparison Of Theravada Buddhism And Mahayana Buddhism

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Religion is a very big subject that many people talk about and have their own way of thinking. Buddhism and Hinduism are the most two biggest religions in the Eastern world. There are many things to these religions that are important. Loren Eiseley had his own way of thinking. He made books and was into the history of science. He admires and believed in the work of Charles Darwin, so Eiseley believed in the science of things. Buddhism first emerged in the 5th century BCE, and is thought to have been developed by a person named Siddharta Gautama. Buddhism does not worship any gods. Instead, followers are called to pursue the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path, towards the goal of achieving Enlightenment. In the process, the followers become liberated from samsara,
There are two major schools of Buddhism: Theravada Buddhism and Mahayana Buddhism.
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In academic circles, Mahayana is further divided into East Asian and Tibetan Buddhism. Buddhism teaches that someone who becomes enlightened without instruction is a Buddha. The primary goal of Buddhism is the liberation from samsara, or the cycle of death and life caused by karma. Samsara is also described as a journey, plagued by illusion and suffering. It is only in confronting samsara, and eventually conquering it, can people achieve true happiness (7 Major Eastern Religions). Loren Eiseley had this quote saying “One could not pluck a flower without troubling a star.” In the Buddhism religion karma is a big thing that they believe in. Karma can be a good thing or a bad thing. If you do something that helps a person out of your generality then something good is going to come your way, but if you do something bad that can hurt a person then be expecting karma to come back to you. It may not be a sudden thing but can be something that can take time. The quote that Loren Eiseley wrote can be related to the way Buddhism things about

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