Lord Of The Flies Hunting Character Analysis

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Oppositely, Jack grows increasingly more violent and aggressive while on the island. At the beginning, Jack likes the idea of severely punishing anyone who breaks the rules. “‘We’ll have rules!’ he [Jack] cried excitedly. ‘Lots of rules! Then when anyone breaks ‘em –’” (Golding 32). Jack is only excited about having rules so that he can punish whoever breaks them. He does not want to maintain order, as opposed to Ralph who institutes these rules in the first place so that all their activities on the island are kept civilized. Jack is able to fulfill his desire to punish and inflict pain when he ties up Wilfred and tortures him. Nobody ever finds out why Wilfred is beaten, which suggests that Jack only did it to inspire awe and fear amongst …show more content…
Furthermore, Jack’s obsession with hunting overrides all other realities and clouds his vision. As he discovers the joys of the hunt, he gets addicted to it. “His mind was crowded with memories; memories of the knowledge that had come to them when they closed in on the struggling pig, knowledge that they had outwitted a living thing, imposed their will upon it...” (Golding 74). Earlier in the novel, Jack claims that hunting is important because it is a key element to their survival. He spends his time developing and enhancing his hunting skills, while the rest of the boys are off building the shelters. He claims that he does so for the greater good of the group, but as the aforementioned quote shows, he hunts due to the satisfaction it provides his primal instincts. Jack desires the feeling of power and superiority he feels when killing pigs and yearns to exercise control over something weaker than he is. Unlike Ralph, Jack does not act for the common good of the group, but for selfish reasons. He does not help with the shelters and their plan of rescue, but instead disrupts them as he is constantly taking boys away from their …show more content…
At the start of the novel, Ralph is focused on the fire, as it serves a purpose for the boys to be rescued. He repeatedly tells the boys to keep the fire lit on the top of the mountain, for the smoke will signal their presence to passing ships. “‘The fire is the most important thing on the island. How can we ever be rescued except by luck, if we don’t keep a fire going?... I tell you smoke is more important than the pig, however often you kill one…’” (Golding 86-87). Ralph is frustrated by Jack and his hunters because they are not performing one of their primary duties, creating a signal fire and sustaining it. Ralph knows that keeping a signal fire going is their only hope at rescue, but Jack and the other boys do not share his same mentality. They seem to have forgotten all about rescue. They lost their focus and made hunting their priority, but Ralph is ready to re-focus them back on the significance of keeping the fire alight. In doing so, he shows initiative, which is a key attribute of an effective leader. He is attempting to maintain whatever vestige of order and civilization they have left. Unlike the other boys, Ralph’s vision is still intact. In the face of their disintegrating society, he presses ahead, keeping the end goal of getting rescued. Unfortunately in this situation, he is a little more forceful to make sure the boys know he is serious. Moreover, Ralph is focused on

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