Loneliness And Slavery In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Improved Essays
Companionship is highly similar to oxygen. They are both needed for humans to survive and thrive. Just like inadequate oxygen or a lack of companionship, isolation creates unwanted effects. Examples of these dangerous effects are selfishness and evil, which can lead to suicide. In fact, the novel Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, proves these theories of solitude to be true. In Frankenstein, Shelley paints the picture of a monster created by an isolated man, but no one cares for or loves the monster. The man, Victor Frankenstein, runs away from his monstrous creation and dedicates his life to finding and destroying it. However, the monster tells a different story, where he keeps himself in isolation and sadness because of every human’s scornful …show more content…
An example of this is when Frankenstein is back at his home in Geneva and wondering whether he should leave to go back to work when he ponders to himself, “Through the whole period during which I was the slave of my creature I allowed myself to be governed by the impulses of the moment; and my present sensations strongly intimidated that the fiend would follow me and exempt my family from the danger of his machinations” (166). Through Shelley’s application of slave imagery in Frankenstein, she argues that emotions enslave human nature. “Slave of my creature” is an example of this slave imagery, as Frankenstein’s emotions toward the creature he has created are enslaving him for his passion of revenge. Shelley further adds to her argument by adding “governed by the impulses of the moment” to directly illustrate that Frankenstein’s emotions are holding him captive because of his isolation from the world, which leads to him choosing to create a monster. Frankenstein did not start out as a slave to his passion, but because of his prolonged isolation from the world and interactions with his creation, his passionate revenge took hold of him. In the same fashion, Shelley continues to prove her point through the monster, as his vengeful, master language mirrors that of Frankenstein’s slave of passion language. Frankenstein decides to destroy his work of the female companion, which was a request from the monster. After the monster observes this awful act of destruction, he sneaks inside and commands to Frankenstein, “Slave, I before reasoned with you, but you have proved yourself unworthy of my condescension. Remember that I have power; you believe yourself miserable, but I can make you so wretched that the light of day will be hateful to you. You are my

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Rather than capitulating with the Creature’s demands, Frankenstein provokes the Creature in search of his own emotional fulfillment. The Creature demands Frankenstein make it a companion, so it will not be the only one of its kind. Frankenstein agrees to do so, but destroys the second creation in view of the Creature. Victor assembled another creation, despite some apprehension, only to destroy the Creature’s mate. "I was now about to form another being, of whose dispositions I was alike ignorant; she might become ten thousand times more malignant than her mate, and delight, for its own sake, in murder and wretchedness."…

    • 1662 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Frankenstein describes his longing for his creation’s death by an outside force, and as he shows his apprehension to destroying the one thing to which he gave life, he tries to hang onto his innocence. Comparatively to Frankenstein, the monster’s language mirrors the ideals of revenge of Frankenstein. As the monster plots revenge against his creator, he threatens, “Yet mine shall not be the submission of abject slavery. I will revenge my injuries; if I cannot inspire love, I will cause fear, and chiefly towards my arch-enemy, because my…

    • 1657 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Although many people consider ugly creature’s monsters, Mary Shelley shows throughout Frankenstein that true monstrosity is shown through one’s actions and intentions, not their looks. In the novel, Victor Frankenstein is portrayed as a mad man who is striving to discover the secret of life. He creates an unnamed creature who begins to wreak havoc across Europe. In the end of the story, Victor chases after the creature to the North Pole where the two each suffer a gruesome fate. At first glance, this creature would seem like the monster of the story as it is by his hands that many lost their lives, but Shelley argues that in fact it is Victor who is the monster.…

    • 1202 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    What first began as an innocent boy’s invention became a destructive force that ruined the lives of many. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is a shrilling novel that that visualizes the consequences of wanting revenge on a person. The novel follows the life of a young scientist names Victor Frankenstein, His love for science and technology inspired him to create a creature out of old body parts. When the creature comes to life, Victor abandons him causing the monster to have a thirst for revenge. Revenge is seen throughout the novel as many events that lead up to the ending are based off of the revenge the monster feels towards his creator.…

    • 1149 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The use of “a thousand times” proves how the guilt consumes him, but he never tells anyone that the monster was the true killer. This represents how Frankenstein’s creation of the monster lead to corruption. The knowledge he needed to make this monster caused this corruption and the false accusations that were placed on Justine. As a result of the trial, the views people have in Frankenstein’s society were exposed. Many people neglected to support Justine because of the evidence help against her, which turned out to be false.…

    • 1300 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Frankenstein by Mary Shelley follows the story of a man named Victor Frankenstein who strives to create a perfect being, but eventually only creates a disturbing monster. He abandons his creation and the monster eventually wreaks havoc, killing several people and taunting his creator in an endless chase. Both Victor and the monster hide themselves away from society out of disgrace and fear, allowing them to create new ethical ideas. Social isolation leads to a loss of morality. Solitude induces a shameful development of morals.…

    • 892 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Frankenstein shows his evil side by causing people to fear the Monster. The Monster’s appearance is entirely the fault of Frankenstein, whether he wants him to look the way he does or not. As a result, the Monster has to face the consequences. He is “shot”, looked at in “disgust”, and “turned away [from]”. The Monster later on confronts Frankenstein, during Act Three, and he then begins to understand how “cruel” he is.…

    • 435 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Experiencing total social and cultural isolation in nature, the monster despaired and yearned for interaction. As a result of this desperation, the walking corpse eventually finds William Frankenstein, who the monster murders out of loneliness. Then, the monster finds Henry Clerval, Frankenstein’s friend, and ends his life as well. The death of his family member and his friend rattled Frankenstein, and he began to feel forsaken. The chain of loneliness between the two only expands, until it eventually reaches its height when Frankenstein confronts his creation.…

    • 763 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Obviously, towards the start of the book, it is the monster who seeks revenge against his creator because he feels wronged; Frankenstein abandons the creature. who is his “Adam,” and dooms him to eternal loneliness and pain by making him ugly. After the creature is rejected by everyone he encounters, including the De Lacey family, who he felt great affection and performed kindnesses for, he vows vengeance against all mankind, especially against his creator, for creating him and making him suffer, sending him “forth to this insupportable misery” (Shelley 97). He exacts his revenge by murdering Frankenstein’s little brother (and Justine, indirectly), wanting to cause him great anguish, just as he has gone through. When Victor destroys the female companion he was working on, he also destroys any last hope the creature had for happiness, for salvation from his painful solitude.…

    • 1457 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The monster gets so desperate for companionship that he kidnaps and young boy hoping to teach him to love but instead ends up killing him. After all this, he monster tells his request to Frankenstein, "I am alone and miserable. Man will not associate with me; but one as horrible and deformed as myself would not deny herself to me. My companion must be of the same species and the same defects. This being you must create."…

    • 1054 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Superior Essays