Living Like Weasel

Superior Essays
While absorbing the cinematic film, Grizzly Man (created by Herzog), and the intriguing texts, Too Much of A Good Thing (Tracy Frisch interviewing Daniel E. Lieberman) & The Vow of the Weasel (written by Dillard), a more concise understanding betwixt modern-day culture, humans, and animals periodically blossom through each story, adding a new piece to the complex puzzle incorporated within the lexicon of the “humanimal”. Consequently, these forms of media all share a common syntactic thread of modern culture neglecting the human body, which eventually spirals a human’s personal environment & culture downward. This thread ultimately suggests an answer for why humans look towards nature/animals, for reassurance, security, and to regain an unconscious, …show more content…
The concept of Living Like Weasels promotes the unconscious thinking Treadwell experienced, and to reverse the normality that humans must think before they act. Beholding a Weasel’s careless senses has been lost within human culture because we are constantly thinking about what occurs in the past, present, and future rather than using a Weasel’s “plug into that pulse” mindset. For example, when Timothy Treadwell reciprocated direct eye contact with a Grizzly bear (more specifically, Mr. Chocolate). Treadwell did not have anything on his agenda, he did not think, it was a moment between him and the bear and nothing else mattered. This form of unconsciousness, influenced by Weasels and Grizzlies, creates a lens of determination and focus needed to survive and prevail from the negative effects of modern culture. Dillard solidifies the importance and meaning of mindless thinking when he defines the idea as, “the purity of living in the physical senses and the dignity of living without bias or motive”. Even though Treadwell’s experienced concluded negatively, he lived in the Grizzly Maze and emphasized that he embraced the unexpectedness of his situation by not thinking and focusing on what he was there to do, …show more content…
Consequently, there has been a brief duration of evolutionary biology dedicated to culture and adaptation, which has created the societal groupthink of needing tools to survive; the constant necessity to overthink and cultural crutches have self-harmed the linear path tailored for the human body. This concept takes form of a catalyst through the creation of harmless and lethal diseases solely because of the human body’s inability to adapt into the culture and environment in today’s society. The text, The Vow of The Weasel, advocates the human body should absorb the unconscious flow of a Weasel, while the elements in Too Much of A Good Thing stem from the necessity to connect the human body to the animal through cultural crutches. In the text, Lieberman explains that the human body had become far less independent due to the poor adaptation of the human body and the use of cultural crutches, tools that have evolved to help the human body sustain and survive. However, in reality, the cultural crutches of modern culture have evolved the human body into weaker and more vulnerable organisms. For example, modern day medicine. Lieberman emphatically expresses the importance of how, “our bodies are poorly adapted to the environments in which we now live” (5). The author imposes medicine weakens a human’s immune system, making the human body less sustainable, because the human body adapts to medicine rather

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