Oppression In American Literature

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Literature Against Oppression Freedom of being who you are and acceptance is something that people with blessing overlook, and people without it strive to attain. Throughout American literature and history, problems of injustice have always been present. Sadly, many just accept that the fact that they are detested by society, very few know how to fight against it. The community has a way of creating a variety of oppression groups, American Literature being no exception, such as race and gender. Only with the help of these daring, brave authors can society evolutionize, each in their own unique way. Authors, Frederick Douglass and Elizabeth Staton provide to American Literature, through their speeches, essays, and writing, therefore allowing …show more content…
The gender role of the women consisted of maintain household order, encourage faith and moral development, and subordinate men. At first women were satisfied with this work, since they felt as a help to the growing nation at the time. Although as time went on, women became hungry for a role in their government. Despite this want, very few women dared to challenge society’s views. This was until Elizabeth Cady Staton came and catalyzed a change. Staton would quickly become president of the National Woman Suffrage Association (Gordon 337). Here she led women who wanted to prove themselves as equals with men, have rights in government, and a wider range of jobs. Elizabeth Staton was brilliant, using strategy that would create a multitude of events that would eventually lead to the nineteenth amendment, granting women the right to …show more content…
Firstly, both activists had been sufferers of their oppression first hand and it was because of this they felt they had to help cause the difference. Both Douglass and Staton strategized to be acknowledged by taking over a main source of entertainment, literature. It was through their literature where audiences could get a feel for the struggles faced in their own society. Not only that, but but both practiced the art of non-violent activism helping to be admired and respected by many. Despite all of the physical and emotional abuse they had received, they could of treated them accordingly. They didn't though because they new the pain and agony felt when you abuse someone like that and what they were fighting for was completely against that. Douglass and Staton were both the catalysts needed at the time to carve in a place for those people who society would not allow to fit in. Although the progress was slow, results greater than that could not be

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