Robert Frost's Poetry

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Robert Frost has been called the translator of new England, but in a truer meaning, he is really the translator of nature and humanity as whole. His poetry shows that he is a close observer of both people and nature. He doesn’t skim a landscape, or take a quick look or two at life. Instead, he looks carefully at anything and everything; he looks into " the crater of the ant" (Oster, 1991, P.36). Because of his commitment to poetry in English Literature, Frost holds a unique position in writing. He appears to share a few comparable contemplations in his verse. His adoration for Beauty and Nature, and worry for the Eternal and Political turmoil are additionally showed in his poetry. He regularly manages individuals interfacing with each …show more content…
Frost possesses deep love and sympathy towards nature which is the source for inspiration. He used to wander in the woods with his kids, and looked into the starry sky before sleep, from which he got the spiritual meaning out of nature. However, the typical pastoral life is not the central theme in Frost’s poems. Instead, Frost concentrates on the dramatic conflict happened in the natural world, such as the confusion and dilemma in life (as in “Mending Wall”), and the danger of nature (as in “Exposed Nest”). According to Frost, nature is not only the source of pleasure, but also an inspiration for human wisdom. People will get the enlightenment from observation (as in the “Birches”). Nature becomes a central character in his poetry rather than merely a …show more content…
Astoundingly, this short poem has produced impressive insightful editorial and investigation throughout the most recent century, and the pages on which they are printed likely required the unmistakable cutting of an old-development New England forest. The Oven Bird is an unusual work containing an expanded illustration, in which a bird, the Oven Bird, becomes the poet, and vice versa. The song of this bird is the work of the poet - molding dialect into reasonable structures, making planned sound - changing the association with nature and dialect. The Oven Bird has caused much debate throughout the years. Some think it a reaction to a prior poem by one Mildred Howells, who composed a wistful poem titled And No Birds Sing, which Frost knew about. The primary line of The Oven Bird could be an immediate counter to this title: 'There is a singer everyone has heard'. "The Oven Bird" is a sporadic work that investigates in different ways the issue of "what to make of a diminished thing." The poet does not allude to the bird straightforwardly by its other basic name of "instructor bird" (in view of the similarity of its emphasized call to "educator") yet ascribes to the bird an enlightening talk about diminishment, the descending push of things. Amidst summer, this bird helps one to remember the fall (particularly the petal fall) that is as of now past and of the tumble to come(Steven G. Kellman.

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