Mother To Son By Langston Hughes Analysis

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When you write something, what are your goals when you write it? Langston Hughes was one poet that wrote because he had goals in mind. One of his goals was to write was about the time of unfair treatment in the USA. His poems are made to connect the races in this time. One inspiration of why he wrote this poem is because he showing the hard life that many of the African Americans had/have. Whether it be the slave-ship, plantations, reconstruction, or the great migration to the urban north. The person telling this to her child isn’t a mother of physical form, but the entire African American community in the time of segregation. At the time that Hughes wrote this poem was when he was starting his career as a poet. He had a lot of concerns. In this specific poem, we can see that this poem is showing the struggle of coming to terms with these struggles. That was the main reason of why the poet wrote this poem.

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