Lightness And Darkness In Native Son

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Native Son In the novel Native Son, Bigger, along with his family, faces an abundant amount of difficult decisions, each of which affects his life in one way, or another as the story progresses and develops. This novel deals with the hardships and pain that African Americans, particularly males, faced in the 1930s. Although Bigger is often viewed as being a villain of the novel, he was merely a product of the 20th century Chicago society. In the time period in which this novel is set in African Americans were somewhat seen as being invisible to white society, similar to the way the narrator feels in the Invisible Man. Bigger although, seen as a tough individual by others of his ethnicity, around the white people his whole demeanor …show more content…
Her mother, Mrs. Dalton wears white whenever she appears in the novel. The comparison of lightness and darkness is prevalent throughout the course of the entire novel. Wright uses the comparison of sunshine (natural light) and darkness with whiteness and blackness as a theme throughout the entire book; when describing whiteness it seen as beautiful, inspiring, and pure. But when describing blackness it is referred to as being dark, heavy, and gloomy, he even describes the rat the Thomas’ apartment in the beginning of the novel as being a “huge black rat” (qtd. in Van Hoose 47). Most of the time they are referenced separately and have opposite connotations; the only time that darkness and lightness is mentioned together in a positive way is when lightness is only paired while they are in the movie theatre; Bigger then imagines "pictures of naked black men and women whirling in wild dances" together on the movie screen (qtd. in Van Hoose …show more content…
They “walked along the street in the morning sunshine” and entered “the darkened movie” (qtd. in Van Hoose 47). This is done in order to figuratively remind the reader that Bigger is constantly crossing between the two worlds as he travels back and forth between his side of town and the nicer side of town where the Daltons live. Throughout the entire novel Wright uses “filmic techniques” to make his text more compelling to his readers (Gercken 633). He uses a way of writing that feels very visual which allows the reader to create their own visual images as they move forward with the story. Wright clearly planned on transferring his work to the big screen to be watched by audiences as

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