Life Changing Effects Of Cerebral Palsy

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As humans, we often find ourselves very observant of details. What tends to be even more appealing to the eye, is when an individual has a noticeable disability. I chose to do my research project on cerebral palsy and the life changing effects that it has on an individual’s life. While a child may differ physically from others, they are still a child who deserves acceptance in their life. In today’s society, it has become very challenging to be accepted into the “norm” without having a disability, let alone having one! To this current day, is no cure that has been found for cerebral palsy, however acceptance, knowledge, and nurture are a few factors that can help make a child or individual accept their life the way that it is. Another important …show more content…
“A comprehensive medical and developmental history, functional assessment, neuroimaging, and a thorough physical examination are necessary for the assessment and diagnosis of cerebral palsy” (Matson) In order for doctors and/or parents to determine if a child has cerebral palsy, they must first observe the child and their developmental milestones. As sad as it sounds, it may take a while to diagnose a child with cerebral palsy because there are no testing that can be done to specifically diagnose cerebral palsy. Unless a child’s symptoms are severe, doctors usually do not diagnose cerebral palsy until a child is one or two years of age. If the child shows slight or mild symptoms of cerebral palsy, it may take even longer for the …show more content…
One child may be have a very slight touch of cerebral palsy, allowing them to attend a public school and have an average intelligence. Then on the other hand, there may be a child who is unable to talk and walk and will need assistance their whole life. Since cerebral palsy can be presented in many different forms, it can be “classified based on motor functions: spastic, dyskinetic, ataxic, and mixed.” (Matson) Among these classifications of cerebral palsy, the most common is spastic. It is estimated that “70-80%” (Matson) of cerebral palsy cases are classified as spastic. Spastic means that the muscle tone tends to be described as stiff, leading their body movements to be discordant and jerky. The other 20% of cerebral palsy cases are non-spastic, meaning that decreased muscle tone is commonly seen. The “non-spastic” cases are split into two additional categories, dyskinetic and ataxic. Ataxic tends to zero in on balance and coordination. Dyskinetic is when movements are involuntary. More commonly effected are the hands, arms, and legs. Lastly is the mixed group. This is when more than one of the types of cerebral palsy are present. This is a major reason why being educated on cerebral palsy is important. There are many ways to go about handling a child who has cerebral palsy and without the proper education, it can make it difficult to remain developmentally appropriate if you do not fully understand the child’s condition and the

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