Liberation Theology Movement Analysis

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Transitioning to a more modern movement, particularly in Latin America. During the 1950s-1960s cities such as, Peron, Argentina, Cardenas, Mexico, and other cities experience dramatic industrial change. The economy and financial status of social classes enhanced however, will progress comes with change. Therefore, the ones who did not benefit from the revolution were the peasants and those in poor communities. This eventually led to social-structure movements that intended to diminish the gap between social classes and provide equality economically. The Liberation Theology Movement affirms freeing of social, political, economic maltreatment as an attempt of salvation. Early 1960s, the church was riding a new wave. The churches began to take …show more content…
Therefore, the Church believed that they should physically engaged in helping the poor of Latin America. Second Vatican Council, Latin America Bishops, Leonardo Boff, and Juan Luis Segundo inspired liberationists. In contrast, those who opposed the movement such as Pope John Paul II and various authorities (Military) conducted procedures to make their protest obvious. While submitting documents for the poor, Pope John Paul II began to discard bishops who supported “base communities” (communities of the poor) or the Liberation Theology movement, and replaced them with other churchmen. The Military authorities feared that the Movement would overthrow their dictatorship. In 1979, overthrowing the dictatorship was successful. However, in El Salvador, a brutal civil war (1979-1992) broke out after tensions reached peak between Vatican and the theologians. In attempts to save their governmental stance, militants would torture, arrest, and murder those involved in the Liberation Theology Movement. During the movement, one of the primary characters, Gustavo Gutierrez a catholic priest who, attached the theology of Marx’s and capitalism to justify how Christianity was being conducted. …show more content…
One theme is weaved throughout each event- the Church grew from their causes or revolution both socially and politically. Socially, the Jews poor people of Latin America, and Romans witnessed dramatic change. Solutions varied however, the social structure became sensible. Politically, the hierarchies of the church, military, and other authority discovered that their “power” is limited compared to the limitless power of the divine. The Church also became aware of itself as an institution to correct its wrongdoings and help the community genuinely. Today, the Christian Church believes that to be free from corruption of different foundations within our community is performed through the teachings of the sacred book, the Bible. To act justly and do onto others as you would like done to you are a couple of rules one should follow to be in accordance with the image of God. To believe in the divine one must also carry out his/her faith. As C.S Lewis would suggest, “[God] will not be used as a convenience. Men or nations who think they can revive the Faith in order to make a good society might just as well think they can use the stairs of heaven as a shortcut to the nearest chemist 's

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