Liberal Criticism And The Liberal Consensus

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The liberal consensus was constructed during an era in which the U.S. was poised to be the worlds singular super power. This was an idealized optimistic image of the United States, promulgated by the beneficiaries of American ingenuity and conquest which was devoid of realism and characterized by its affinity for capitalism, it 's disregard for the disenfranchised and a sense of moral obligation to spread American principles. The liberal consensus was not to last, crumbling in the face of the disenfranchised masses in their arduous endeavor to achieve equality and recognition. The actions of the disenfranchised and various global events would work in unisons to violently shake America back to reality during the 60 's and 70 's. Various historical …show more content…
In the late 40s ' and 50 's promulgated by politician and intellectuals, as well as white middle and upper class Americans. This widely held believe consisted of multiple economic, political and social ideas that were based on the growing wealth and power accumulated by the U.S. after World War 2 and the creation of the atomic bomb. Domestically it was the believe that Americans everywhere were either on a path to or had achieved the American Dream. Further more politician believed that free enterprise and American capitalism would fix all social problem.(Lecture, Corey) This optimistic sentiment also constructed the believe that as the undisputed leaders of the world the U.S. Had a moral obligation to oppose the enemies of democracy and freedom, specifically communism. Essentially, the liberal consensus was the optimism held by those who benefited from the growing economical and political gains after WW2. This caveat is crucial when describing the manner in which this idealistic optimism was evicerated by the harsh realities of disenfranchised masses. Minorities, gays, and women were among the countless American who were not reveling in Americas new found affluence. Instead these individuals were being outright ignored, subjugated and oppressed, as they were deprived of the much touted American Dream. It is this negligence and oppression that would be the foundation for the revolutionary …show more content…
The Civil Rights Movement has its roots in the late 40 's as returning African American veterans and activist began demanding equal rights. (Schaller, PT, pg 113)Their efforts were hampered by violence from whites attempting to intimidate them. Despite the violence they confronted, black activist adopted a strategy of non violent protest inspired by Gandhi. (Schaller, PT, pg 113) These protest included sit ins, swim ins, desegregated bus,trips through the south and a boycott of the buses in Montgomery. The violence perpetrated on African Americans through out this period was being witnessed by the entire country, and various parts of the world, as photos and videos of white retribution and intimidation were broadcasted nation wide. The images of Emitt Till 's disfigured corpse, the images of black students being harassed and abused by scores of white people as they attempted to desegregate schools and videos of black activist being attacked by cops using fire hoses, cattle prods and dogs, were being distributed across the United States. This became a visible crack in the liberal consensus that motivated white Americans to act in solidarity with their African American brethren, alerting them to the fact that the prosperity of the nation was in fact not all inclusive. Even president Johnson was partly motivated to pass The Voter Registration Act of 1965 because of his "revulsion at the

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