The Seventeenth Century: The High Middle Ages

733 Words 3 Pages
Continuing, “The High Middle Ages” (1200-1400), the Gieses broke the era into two centuries; the 13th century was considered the “Golden Century, an era of affluence and growth” in contrast the 14th century of catastrophe and contraction (Gies 166). The 6th chapter is devoted to the High Middle Ages, the authors elaborate on the continuation of technological momentums that the Europeans experienced during this first century of this era. Another advancement that must be mentioned of is the beneficial impact in which the Mongols conquests had on linking Europe and Asia. This link would make the Chinese technologies and cultivations easily accessible. All good things must end, as the exceedingly populations reached their peaks and the land and …show more content…
The fifteenth century had weapons that used gunpowder, printed books, and transoceanic voyages, and the beautiful art. The Middle Ages had left its imprint on the world, the navigation and ship technology that Christopher Columbus would sail the ocean blue in 1942 was a modify Middle Age technology. Subsequently, the printing press, ink, and paper had all been discovered before the fifteenth century, innovations had just been made. Thirdly, the gunpowder and firearms would be redefined and become more advance. Typography changed the printing world, and printing press shops became a vital part of civilization. Leonardo Da Vinci and his predecessors’ brilliant minds created arts, sculptures, ideas, inventions, and various plans that all proved beneficial to society. This chapter is composed of the technological advances that the Europeans made including, the mechanical clock, the new navigation system, and the superior ships. Immaculate and well-educated inventors would transpire prior inventions as well as created new ones. The 15th century was an environment of knowledge and …show more content…
The Gies book provided an enjoyable means to learn about the inventions that existed, transformed, and influenced the world centuries later. The span of a thousand years from 500 A.D. to 1500 is divided up into a feasible book that is not confusing, nor boring. The Gies’ illustrated with both words and pictures of the techniques, in which things were made, for example the weaving of cloth, made comprehension much easier. I strongly recommend this book to any individual needing or yearning for knowledge about the Medieval times. The authors grasped my attention from the first to last page with a pleasurable reading, teaching me new information, along with changing my view of the Middle Ages

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