Classical School Of Criminology

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Introduction
The title of chapter three is "Early Explanations for Criminal Behavior" in the book "Criminology" written by Leonard Glick & J. Mitchell Miller is broken down into six mini sections. "Introduction: Theories of Crime" which explains what they are going to talk about in the chapter. "Traditional Explanations for Crime" discusses spiritual explanations for crime and treatment of criminals, the basis of natural explanations of crime, and deliberates about the origins and base traditions of the classical school of criminology. The mini section "Cesare Beccaria" renders about eighteenth-century European classical school 's perspective on crime and how it contrasted with criminal law. "Jeremy Bentham" converses utilitarianism, views
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During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, people who engaged criminal activity were believed to be possessed by demons and/or evil spirits. As a punishment, banishment and exorcism were used. The Classical school of criminology is the first principle that is still implied today is talked about, meaning that people rationally choose to commit the crime and have the ability to choose right from wrong. The Classical school of criminology principle was recognized by Cesare Beccaria and Jeremy Bentham. Auguste Comte was the founder of the positivist school of criminology. This view is based on behavior is determined by measurable factors beyond human control. Raffaele Garofalo, Cesare Lombroso, and lastly Enrico Ferri all developed further theories into the positivist school of criminology principle. Rational Choice theory is the idea that a criminal rationally chooses the crime and what the target of the crime maybe. Rational Choice also is the "stresses the point that society can achieve a high degree of crime prevention by focusing on the situational aspects that influence particular types of criminal behavior" (76). Deterrence theory is an individual 's choice to commit or chose not to commit a crime is influenced by the fear of punishment. The Economic model is "criminal behavior follows a calculation whereby criminals explore the perceived costs, rewards, and …show more content…
My only concern with this chapter is since it touches on the basics of some of the theories, models, and perspectives that are relevant today; I think that the chapter should have been introduced earlier. Yes, it is number three but I think with chapter two being "The Nature and Extent of Crime: Measuring Behavior" and chapter one "Crime and Criminology". I believe that the book could have been improved if this was originally chapter two instead of three. For the simple fact of how it talks about early founders, basics of theories and where/who created them, I just feel like that is something to introduce as quickly as possible. The quality of research the authors do is impeccable. They really go in-depth with what they are talking about. For example, the chapter talks about "RAT" (routine activities theory) it tells you what the basic idea of it, then it elaborates on who the study is about "RAT focus on direct-contact violations" (79) than on the side of the page is tells you what a predatory violation

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