Legal Translation Case Study

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Thematization:
According to Varo and Hughes (2002), the Problem of thematization is a serious case in legal translation. Does the translator have to preserve the syntactic structure and neglect the focus of the text or the other way round. Every sentence has a subject and a predicate. This subject may not be the theme of the sentence. The translator has to preserve the syntactic structure and convey the same focus in the same time. In this case, the translator has the right to estimate the situation and reposition the parts of the sentence in the best way from his own point of view. But he has to keep in mind that legal translation is about accuracy and has to convey the same meaning (pp.190-192)
Based on Varo and Hughes opinion, a translator
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Moreover, Legal Language is related directly to Legal system. This means that the expected occurrence rate of cultural specific concepts is very high. The translator’s role is to find the best equivalent for these concepts without affecting the meaning. Keeping in mind that his target is to create a good TL already meant to describe the legal system related to the SL and that is in this aim he has to hold a comparison between legal systems and legal cultures (pp.192-193).
Subordination:
The Feature of subordination is the inclusion of more information about the text in a subordinate parenthetical sentence to the main sentence. This feature exists in English and in Arabic. It is used to clarify the sentence condition and to make it as precise as possible. Dickins, Hervey & Higgins (2002) explain that The Subordinate clause gives more information about the background of the topic but the main sentence is the foregrounded information (p.120). This means that if the sentence is going to undergo fronting then the main idea of the sentence is what is going to be fronted.
Thus in order to hold an English Arabic Comparison of Legal Language, Arabic Features must be taken into
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Arabic Shares some of the English Legal Features mentioned in the past section like doublets and Repetition. But it also has some Arabic specific legal features that will be discussed in this

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