Leaving The Iron Lung, By Anne Laurel Cartier

Improved Essays
A major part of life is pursuing dreams. Life would almost be pointless if people did not have ambitions. We wouldn’t have a reason to get out of bed if they did not have a dream that they want to achieve. Anne Laurel Cartier, the author of the short story “Leaving the iron lung,” specifically looks at how having a dream can affect one’s life. Carter uses conflicting characters, character transformation, and the setting to illustrate that to be content with life one needs to follow their dream, even if they need to commit and sacrifice to achieve it.
First, Carter uses the contrasting characters Agathe and Marie to show that having a dream is an important part of someone’s life. First, Agathe decision to give up her ambition of being a professor
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First, Pauline’s mother takes Pauline’s hockey table and puts it on top of the book shelf so Pauline could not reach it (84). Pauline’s game being moved in location where she cannot reach it represents how initially she feels like she is unable to achieve her dream of playing hockey. The author uses Pauline’s situation to teach the reader that sometimes our goals seem out of reach at first. Second, the triggering event that changes Pauline when Marie gives her a hockey stick (86). By giving Pauline a hockey stick she shows her belief that she is able to achieve her goal, which makes Pauline decide to try to attempt to achieve it. Finally, Pauline she asks her father to play hockey with him and he accepts(87). She ending up playing but compromises by playing in a wheel chair. The author uses Pauline’s adjustment to playing in a wheel chair to show the reader that they might need to compromise make their dream possible. The author uses Pauline’s transformation from being unable to achieve her goal to being able to achieve her goal to teach the reader that in order to accomplish a dream one might need to compromise to make it

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