Essay On Dyslexia

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Learning a Foreign Language
“Dyslexia” is the most recognizable term in the field of learning disabilities. Typically, it is associated with a child’s lack of ability to read. There is much interest in figuring out how to “treat” Dyslexia through specific practice of techniques for developing and improving the reading skills of children. A very common misconception with the term “Dyslexia” is that the parents and other relatives of these children, who have this, think it’s a cause for the child’s difficulty learning to read. Therefore, they are misinformed of the actual meaning of the term. Dyslexia is a descriptive word and is defined as impairment in the ability to read (Webster 's New World Dictionary, 1986).
Although to some people, this disorder may be noticeable, it can actually
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Like I said earlier, it can be hereditary and more than one family member can have it at one time. Reading, writing and spelling are all essential subjects and is vital that dyslexia is identified as early as possible, because the younger you are when identified, the likelihood of overcoming this condition increases. With alternative learning methods, people who have this learning disorder will succeed at reading, writing and spelling as any other person. Combining visual, auditory and tactile instruction appears to enhance both learning and the mastery of a task (SLD Companion Manual, 1998).
There are 3 different types of Dyslexia: Trauma, Primary and Secondary/Developmental. Trauma dyslexia results from a brain injury or brain trauma. Primary dyslexia is a dysfunction of the left side of the brain and doesn’t change with age. Dyslexia that in inherited also falls under the category of primary dyslexia. Lastly, secondary or developmental dyslexia is caused by a hormonal development or malnutrition during early stages of fetal

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