Leadership Self Assessment: Servant Leadership And Servant Leadership In Nursing

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Leadership Self Assessment It is a little hard to think of myself in a major leadership positing, in nursing, since I just graduated from nursing school. I have expressed leadership in other job positions and different aspects of my life that I will use to determine the two that closely resemble my leadership type. The two different leadership types I chose were servant leadership and adaptive leadership. “Servant leadership emphasizes that leaders be attentive to the concerns of their followers, empathize with them, and nurture them” (Northouse, 2015, p. 225). While adaptive leadership, “as the name of the approach implies, adaptive leadership is about how leaders encourage people to adapt- to face and deal with problems, challenges, …show more content…
225). Servant leaders are all about placing the good of everyone else before the leaders. They also make sure to emphasize the development of others before their own. These leaders behave ethically when it comes to working with their peers and others in the organization. “The central focus of the model is the seven behaviors of leaders that foster savant leadership: conceptualizing, emotional healing, putting followers first, helping followers grow and succeed, behaving ethically, empowering, and creating value for the community” (Northouse, 2015, p. 238). So basically, the primary concepts of the servant leadership style is placing the needs of others before their own and making sure everyone is treated with respect and fairness. The result of all this will lead to a better work environment as well as builds a better hospital/organization. Ken Blanchard (2015) would go as far as to say that it is probably the only leadership approach that gives you great results and …show more content…
These approaches are not bad to overuse in the workplace, in my opinion. As nurses, we are a team and collaborating with others to help find a resolution to a problem is the right approach. Every clinical shift in school I was paired up with a preceptor who I was able to collaborate with to help determine the accurate care for my patient. Compromising is also good because it finds the common ground between those who have a conflict. That way each is able to come out with a little and not losing everything. For example, if I were to help another nurse with a task I would make sure to have a compromise, or agreement, that they would in turn help me. I am always willing to help anyone out in the hospital that needs it, but I have to make sure my duties to my patients are not compromised. Lastly, accommodating is good to an extent. It is great to put the needs of others before your own but you need to make sure your needs are met, as well. An example of a time I used accommodation was when I would stay later at work to allow someone else to leave to go meet with some friends, even though I had plans of my own. It was easier to stay later than have to hear about how that person missed seeing their friends. Some would say I have a very hard time telling anyone “NO” even when I do not want to do it. The two approaches I seem to not

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