Leadership And Shein's Theory Of Transformational Leadership

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Transformational leadership involves raising both leaders and followers to achieve greater motivation and morality. Mitchell et al. defined it as, “a style of leadership that transforms followers to rise above their self-interest and challenges them to move beyond their current assumptions (Bass & Riggio 2006; Pieterse et al. 2010).” While transformational change can be highly rewarding, approaching a large change movement due to a shift in worldview needs to be addresses throughout the company. If both leaders and followers do not adjust to the change, it will not stick and the company may falter. By employing transformational leadership where all levels are able to address the change, the change is more likely to be successful. While transformational …show more content…
They theorized that given Shein’s theory of organizational culture (a symbiotic relationship between leadership and culture), the culture in academia and business would look different therefore causing leadership and change management to be different. Studies show that there are different factors that influence the employee’s commitment to organizational change (i.e. managerial practices such as organizational support, transformational leadership, shared values, and communication have been found to be antecedents to commitment to change. They hypothesized that 1) there would be differences in the levels of perceived transformational leadership behaviors between employees working academic institutions and business entities. Specifically, academic leaders are expected to display transformational leadership behaviors more than business leaders. 2) there will be differences in change management between academic and business organizations. 3) they test the mediating role of change management on transformational leadership and commitment to change and whether there would be differences in this relationship among academic and business …show more content…
Organizational transformational was defined as changes in at least two of the following: vision, mission and/or values, strategy, structure, systems, process, technology, business acquisition/merger or downsizing). By those guidelines, the researchers reached out to 85 organizations via letters to their President or HR manager explaining the purpose of the study. Of the 85 organizations, we tapped, 16 responded. Employees from eight higher education academic institutions (305 employees) and eight business organizations (267 employees). In order to compare academic and business organizations, the study focused on the services industry - hospitality, hospitals, entertainment services, and banking. The most common changes implemented in the organization was automation followed by revisiting of organization directions and expansion. Immediately, the researchers noticed process improvement, culture building, downsizing, and mergers were more frequent in business organizations, whereas a greater percentage of academic organizations reported change in strategy and

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