Latin American Social Movement

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Latin American social movements have stimulated silenced divisions of the community including indigenous people, students, LGBT, the unemployed, undereducated and all those who have been excluded from the promised ideal globalized economy. The movements, which include non-violent protests; maintaining culture; and addressing the educational achievement gap have deployed a wide array of strategies and actions which have been outcome oriented. The movements have helped to synthesize old ways of working and finding new paths towards a world that fits all worlds.
Latin Americans often utilized non-violent protests like marches, picketing, boycotts, student unions, and labor unions as a method to perpetuate their social movements. By the end
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Songs, stereotypes, and assumptions like the foregoing forced Latin Americans to fight against the widespread discrimination in employment and aim for greater participation in society by working to bring about change within civic and religious organizations. Members and advocates of the Latin American social movements carried out these objectives through events like the grape boycott in North America; the Aymara uprising in September 2000 in Bolivia; and successive uprisings in Ecuador (Zibechi, 18). “They came together and remain united in the ‘taking of Quito,’ and do not even dissolve or disperse in the mass marches; they stay cohesive and return to their zone, where they continue to maintain collective life” (Zibechi, 18). The non-violent direct action movements even shunned hierarchy and instead promoted family and community daily life. The success …show more content…
Latin America has a deep history that is extremely diverse and historically sundry. The poem, Amanegui, or The Time Has Come, centers on the theme of continuing culture. Culture and language are very important because, not only are they a way of looking at the world, but language and culture actually encode a worldview. Conserving Latin American culture was extremely important for the Latin American social movements because it allowed people to not only know themselves and where they came from, but embodying their traditional culture allowed people to express themselves as well. Culture goes beyond merely expression- culture is also about food and more specifically, sustaining cultural dishes, which, in turn, helps to sustain their economy. Andy Palacio, the author of Amanegui, urges parents to “teach the children Our language and our songs: our beliefs and our dances…The time has come for it to be preserved… [and] for it to be taught” (Palacio). Palacio asks parents to maintain the culture because they are the first, and likely the most influential, teachers a child can have. Americans’ prejudices and discriminatory practices towards Latin American culture helped lay the foundation for the gradual emergence and development of ethnic awareness among the Latin American community. To achieve any level of collective ethnic awareness or solidarity, Latin Americans had to challenge

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