Last Samurai Reflection

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The Last Samurai begins its tale in the year of 1876 in which the samurai and the soldiers of Japan (henceforth referenced to as soldiers) are fighting for two separate things. The soldiers fight because they are ordered to. The samurai under direct control of Katsumoto who is the chief samurai still fights onto the samurai code as well as fighting change that the westerners bring such as clothing, weaponry, and political changes as well. Through the movie Nathan Algren experiences both sides of conflicting ways of thought. He has to help out the soldiers in the first place because he was ordered to by a higher ranking person than he. In these scenarios he is sad, gloomy, and drunk, one could go as far as to say that he was depressed. While …show more content…
He then goes on to train, live with, and eat with the samurai in the encampment while there he is happy, calm and serene. In this respect The Last Samurai contrast the two side of new versus old and sympathizes with the samurai. The film leans toward the samurai way of thinking and can understand and respect what they have to offer. Katsumoto is very well respected, in this manner the movie does an excellent job in adhering to the way of the warrior and its customs. Since Katsumoto and his men all fight for the same cause, which is to deny the conflicting thoughts against the samurai, they are a force that not even greater fire power nor can a greater force stop so easily. Early on it is made apparent that Katsumoto and the soldiers fight two distinct styles in part due to the change that the westerners are bringing. While Katsumoto’s men fight with pride and for honor the …show more content…
As I have stated the samurai fight as a whole and the soldiers fight as an individual. In the beginning of the movie the soldiers suffered a great defeat in the woods because they were unprepared, unmotivated, and scared to their bones. One bit of comradery that the soldiers do display is when Nathan ordered Sergeant Grant to retreat but S. Grant refused so that he may fight in the front lines. Something that would be expected on the samurai side was shown to also be possible for the soldiers. Not only was were the soldiers unprepared but the samurai were very prepared. The samurai came in as an intimidating force overwhelming the soldiers and had prepared a plan beforehand in order to also flank the solders so that they may gain the total win that they attained. The film does have a preference for the group instead of the individual. Subordination to the group (displayed by the soldiers) is an inferior way to fight against individuals who come together to complete a goal (displayed by the samurai). But there always comes a time when people must adapt. The overwhelming advantage that the soldiers had allowed them to defeat the samurai in the final battle but Nathan and Katsumoto didn’t go down so easily. The film suggests two things in the final battle scene in which the soldiers bowed to the harmed samurai; first is that the samurai is a dying practice but; second is that the way of samurai should be a respected way of life that has the

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