Language Development

Improved Essays
Introduction
Language is an important aspect of a child’s development. As interactions with the world become more complex, so too does a child’s need for more complex means of engaging with the world. It is a unique attribute of humans that we develop language as a way of communicating. The need for language is emotional, social and cultural. A child negotiates these needs through speaking and writing, listening and reading. Language is initially transmitted orally and with body language. As communication demands become more complex and abstract, language can be seen in written form. Both spoken and written language develops around a standard set of rules, though these rules are diverse in nature due to social influences and cultural practice.
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Children use language as a means to connect with those around them through use of their body language, verbal language and written communication. While the potential for language is biological, it requires a social environment to be realized (Hoff, 2006, p. 55). In the early years, social use of language is highly functional (Fellowes & Oakley, 2014, p. 28). A child learns to use sounds and gestures to gain attention, to make requests or indicate needs. Language use is socialized at an early age to match community expectations (Hoff, 2006, p. 76), especially in a school environment. In this way, language develops in context and is dependent on the nature of the communicative experiences each child is exposed to (Hoff, 2006, p. 79). A child who is exposed to many rich communicative opportunities will develop language at a higher rate than one this is …show more content…
All social aspects of language arise from a wider cultural context.

different English’s, discourses, aboriginal language
Whorfian hypothesis (Emmitt, 2010, p. 54)

Culture has the role of creating rules so that the social, personal and cultural aspects are compatible. Bernstein’s Deficit View is behavioristic and suggests that elaborated codes are necessary for school learning (Emmitt, 2010, p. 59). Kids are cognitively capable who come from different backgrounds but can rise up and learn as well as children coming from middle class backgrounds.
Language changes over time and in context, so is dynamic.

Children are exposed to more decontextualized language when they reach school (Snow, 1983; Hoff, 2006, p. 69), in contrast to home language, which can create a challenge for those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds.

Conclusion
Language plays an important role in children’s lives. It is both the means of communicating meaning to others, and the means for understanding the world. It is based on a standard system with understood rules, yet is diverse and varied from family to family, and culture to culture. Language is a form of currency with which children can make their way through the world. From the early years of gestures and mimicking of a parent’s speech sounds, to the later years of complex social interaction, sharing of texts and complex reflection

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