Langston Hughes And Claude Mckay's The Weary Blues

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After the world war one and somewhere between the 1930`s, a great cultural event happened in America. The jazz era also known as the Harlem Renaissance had a lot of people flocking to Harlem, New York. According to Richard Wormser from PBS, he states Harlem was considered the mecca to which black writers, artist, musicians, photographers, poets, and scholars traveled. Many came to express their talents freely, and escape oppression in the south and the caste system. It was during this time that many talented artists such as Langston Hughes and Claude McKay started being recognized for their achieved works.
While many intellectual people tried to solidify their status in Harlem, Langston Hughes at the age of twenty-four had already caught the
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Using his poetic artistry, he encompassed African music such as blues and jazz in his poems. Moreover, because of his unique way of portraying the African lifestyle he was criticized by many black intellectuals and the white press. In some of his poems he promoted the American dreams and dignity. Langston believed that one day African American will be free and able to pursue careers. Moreover, his poems expressed the feelings, fears, and dreams of African American`s urging them to find dignity in their daily struggles. Additionaly, Langston 's poems contain evidence of double consciousness. In the poem The Weary Blues? Langston …show more content…
Claude was born in Jamaica and then immigrated to America. McKay role in the jazz era was to show a different perspective having been born outside of America. He influenced Langston Hughes and paved the way for black poets to discuss racism that was happening in America. In McKay “America” Poem, he states, “Although she feeds me bread of bitterness, And sinks into my throat her tigers tooth,”. McKay is quick to tell us how angry and frustrated he his about society. He later states, “I love this cultured hell that tests my youth! Her vigor flows like tides into my blood---, I stand within her walls with not a shred of terror, malice, not a word of jeer.” McKay clearly shows us that he loves America and that it is America that gives him the strength to fight. McKay theme in his poem`s urges African American to persevere and hope for a better future. The poem “America” shows the black struggle struggle and how tough it is to be brought up in it. It talks about about standing up, even though life in it is scary and

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