Lady Macbeth Ambition

1190 Words null Page
Regarded as one of the most powerful female figures in literature, Lady Macbeth stands out far beyond the rest of Shakespeare’s female characters — remarkable for her ambition, boldness, and cruelty. However, these three intense traits contribute to her downfall and eventual suicide. If one was to step back and examine the corpse, the most noticeable feature would be her “wings.” After reading Macbeth’s letter at the beginning of Act I, Scene 5, and learning of the three witches’ prophecies, Lady Macbeth’s ambition begins to bubble as her desire to become Queen by default of Macbeth’s crowning strengthens. This immense desire coupled with her strong ambition leads to her calling upon the spirits that feed off of murderous thoughts to “unsex …show more content…
The guiding force behind Lady Macbeth’s actions is her dream to be queen. She recognizes the higher degree of power in her relationship with her husband, so she begins to entertain the idea of killing King Duncan in order to fulfil the prophecy quicker. Lady Macbeth understands that in order to advance in society, she has to provide the strength for her husband which is done through manipulation. Her main target is ruthlessly prodding at his masculinity. While Macbeth and his Lady discuss committing the heinous act against King Duncan, she expresses her frustration about the lack of action and eggs him on by casually saying, “When you durst do it, then you were a man; / And to be more than you were, you would / Be so much more the man.” (1.7.49-51) Lady Macbeth is so wrapped up in her dream of becoming queen, she doesn’t bat an eyelash at cruelly encouraging her love to commit an act of …show more content…
It is prevalent in the beginning of the play, especially on Macbeth’s part. In the letter explaining the prophecies, Macbeth conveys his affection for his Lady by writing, “This have I thought good to / [communicate to] thee, my dearest partner of greatness, that thou mightst not [be deprived of your rightful joy,] by being ignorant of what greatness is promised thee.” Macbeth seems to have the need to let his wife know of the potential joy they could have in life by ruling as royalty, as this would allow her to be happy and presumably allow for him to lavishly dote on her. Following this, there seems to be a mutual admiration demonstrated throughout the first two acts. However, we begin to see in Act III, after the murder of King Duncan, the decline of their relationship as Lady Macbeth must have her servant retrieve her husband when she wishes to provide comfort, albeit blandly. The distance continues to grow once Macbeth finally has the crown. While contemplating the murder of Banquo, he refuses to conspire with his Lady and settles her by saying, “Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck, / Till thou applaud the deed.” This is almost a complete 180 from the beginning of the play when Lady Macbeth was lighting the fire under her husband to murder King Duncan. From the decline of their love, it can be concluded that their light love and mutual respect has been

Related Documents