Labor Unions Destroy The Free Market Dbq Analysis

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During the 20th century labor unions did destroy the free market by encumbering businesses with regulations essentially penalizing the wealthy for being successful. Reasons such as the Haymarket affair, the Pullman strike, the homestead strike, socialism, progressives, and the A.F.L caused labor unions to destroy the free market. Conflict between unions and management has caused struggle for power in the U.S. Labor unions gave an effort for better wages, reasonable hours and safer working conditions, while the wealthy were economically taking advantage of the workers to improve their wealth.
To begin with, labor unions did destroy the free market by setting up strikes. One well known strike of the 20th century that aided labor unions to destroy the free market is the Haymarket affair. The Haymarket affair was a chain of events to improve labor putting a big disadvantage for the wealthy. For instance, in document B Albert Parson is testifying to the House of Representatives on a demand to decrease worker's schedule and increase worker's income. He also wants the process to happen slow and efficient. The purpose of this movement was in labor demonstration, but
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In fact, in document, Samuel Gompers thoroughly explains what the American federation of labor has done for the society. To sum it up, AFL organized strikes, boycotts and negotiations for a successful outcome. Samuel Gompers would purposely organize working men in craft unions, which was made out skilled workers who specialize in crafts. The AFL mainly focuses on the rights of unskilled workers and on promoting strikes. The American federation of labor impacted the wealthy because socialist and working men would strike and boycott them. This caused the wealthy to lose a lot of money due to working men revolting and

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