Labor Revolution In The Post Revolution

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Post Revolution America prompted major changes to the economy which fostered changes to labor. America’s labor force was evolving from the simple farmers working for subsistence to paid labors in factories. As subsistence farming became no longer necessary the creation of surplus goods started. The production of surplus goods encouraged craftsman to begin to specialize. New inventions and machinery produced efficient factories. Factories could mass produce goods that then be shipped across America. Factories grew quickly and hundreds of new factories were built to keep up with demand for goods. Factory workers became a major part of the country’s’ workforce and developed their own new class. The working class which developed their own …show more content…
(pg. 374) The increased demand for raw materials like sugar and tobacco also changed the market logic for southern agriculture. The Southern market would need an increased labor force to keep up with demand. Slaves for centuries played a key role in southern labor force. The expanded market increased the demand for production and labor. The slave trade exploded. In the 1820’s 155,000 slaves were sold into the labor market. (pg. 374) Slaves are advertised as products for sale alongside manufactured goods, factory equipment and livestock. (pg. 374) The domestic slave trade comprised as much as an estimated 15 percent of the Southern economy. (pg. 374). The growth of slavery during this time period became important because of the labor revolution. Free white men and woman could work similar status jobs in the north and be free, so why should African Americans still remain slaves? The country was beginning to notice that free workers identified with a working class that demanded better treatment but slaves are still characterized by race and considered property. The rise of democratic participation in politics by white men in America helped to divide political responses to the acceleration of the American market economy, specifically on the issue of slavery. (pg. …show more content…
As employers adopted new technologies, including clocks and steam-driven machinery, they expected workers to increase their own efficiency. (pg. 459) The religious change targeted the old tradition of morning beer breaks, which remained from the European cultures. American prohibition brought on by the religious changes also ensured that working men did not arrive late or drunk. The new religious views ensured a more reliable workforce. (pg. 461) The religious reforms brought on an antislavery attitude and sparked larger reform in the Southern states. The early followers often criticized slaveholding, but mostly sought ways to accommodate slaves’ religious faith. (pg. 461) Religious slave owners came to regard the act of ministering to slaves as the purest expression of their faith. (pg. 461) However, at this time it was still illegal to teach slaves to read even if it was the Bible. The general though among religious slave owners was that those who remained in Africa would still be slaves, but the slaves of non-Christians and would spend eternity in torment. At least the slaves of Christians would be converted to Christianity and assured eternal

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