The Role Of Jean-Paul Marat's Personal Role In The French Revolution

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In this investigation Jean-Paul Marat’s newspaper, L’Ami Du Peuple, and his personal role in the French Revolution will be compared to the French radical group, the Jacobins, to determine what extent did Marat’s newspaper influence the Jacobins’ policies during the Revolution. Shifts in political or social stances, personal ideals, and even governmental beliefs in the material covered in L’Ami du Peuple and the actions taken by the group will be talked about to determine a relationship between the two. The relationship between Jean-Paul Marat and Maximilien Robespierre will be looked at due to the position Robespierre held within the Jacobins. Comparisons between the groups of people who read Marat’s publication and those who were Jacobins, …show more content…
He was liberal and became increasingly more liberal as the Revolution continued, yet he still maintained that the king was the one to rule France but with the possibility of impeachment. Several of writers have even mention that Marat didn’t believe in a republican form of government in his early years and did not refer to it in his newspaper either (Gottschalk, 1921). Marat had pre-held conviction while entering the Revolution, ones that were developed along side his interest in government and society in England and France. Marat’s beliefs and opinions were also strengthened by studies that centered around John Wilkes, an 18th century journalist and politician that possibly began English Radicalism (Sainsbury, 1995). Due to the Revolution, that introduced him into political life, Marat learned more about the upper classes which support his preconceived opinions and drove him to speak for the lower …show more content…
Even after the first appearance of his newspaper Marat still believed in a monarchy for France, he just had altered his beliefs in what the king could and couldn’t do. Marat had came to believe that he always considered Louis XVI an enemy of the Revolution and that Louis should abdicate and leave the Dauphin and his education to Robespierre. Though the king proved himself unable to rule France Marat still believed in a monarchy over a republic, believing that the proposed constitution was a complete failure (Gottschalk, 1921). With his publication Marat appealed and circulated to the French as well as spread his beliefs through the county. L’Ami du Peuple gained support from mainly craftsman, small entrepreneurs, and government officials, it also was circulated more in urban areas rather than rural ones, which likely affected the number of Jacobins in the countryside compared to cities (Fajn, 1972). Artisans and petty tradesmen, including shoemakers, masons, butchers, made up 25.4 percent of the Jacobin clubs and later increased to 33.5 percent of the club. The sans-culottes, which Marat appealed and supported to, made up about 50 percent of the clubs members, suggesting that the circulation and the issues addressed in Marat’s newspaper membership. Of course membership varied in each Jacobin Club based on the regions, but due to the large number of artisans and tradesmen they

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