I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud And An Essay On Man

Great Essays
Human nature has always preyed upon worldly nature for creative inspiration. It is human nature to fashion oneself as a god, creating worlds and influencing thought by one stroke of a pen. In a writer’s creation, worldly nature is a necessary component of his imaginary world. Whether nature is praised or cursed by an author, a human’s only opportunity to control nature lies within ink and paper, which explains why nature is such a prevalent theme in literature. Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Pope took the liberty to create their very own worlds, vastly different though each of these worlds may be. However, “Kubla Khan,” “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” and “An Essay on Man” all possess one underlying similarity; they reflect their respective authors’ …show more content…
When the the first person speaker happens upon the field of daffodils, he transitions from an almost dejected condition to a state of bliss. The lonely wanderer stumbles upon a milky way meadow, a poet’s dream. The comparison of the yellow flowers to a majestic system of stars creates a sacred vision in the reader’s mind, almost like Wordsworth has had a glimpse of the afterlife. This unearthly description parallels the “holy and enchanted” Xanadu. Similarly, still in reference to the field of daffodils, Wordsworth’s language exudes an air of religious awe. Because he refers to the multitude of flowers as a “host,” though this term is synonymous with the word “crowd,” it could also compare the flowers to a heavenly host of angels. In Holy Communion, a sacramental wafer is also known as a “Host,” as some Christian denominations believe Christ’s body is physically present in the wafer. Assuming Wordsworth was aware of the religious connotations of the term, one could deduce the narrator, who is most likely Wordsworth himself, regards the host of daffodils as a holy force capable of absolving his sin of melancholia. Both “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” and “Kubla Khan” transport their readers to an otherworldly dimension through their devout worship of nature. If one conjectures that Wordsworth’s view of nature corresponds with the first-person narrator of his poem, then it is evident that his ideal world is reflected in the field of daffodils. Nonetheless, a reader should consider a literary work as a separate entity from its author, meaning one cannot be sure this absolutely reflects Wordsworth’s experiences or

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    In “Pied Beauty” by Gerald Manley Hopkins and “Composed Upon Westminster Bridge” by William Wordsworth, both poets express their feelings upon the beauty of nature but on different ways. Hopkins fascinates for the variety of nature that God has created for the reason that it makes the nature to be unique in their own way. On the other hand, Wordsworth wonders at the silence and tranquility in nature that breaks through the morning in London. In title of the poem, “Pied Beauty,” we can make an assumption about the theme. “Pied” means something that has more than one color.…

    • 984 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Portrayal Of Nature Essay

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The speaker in Wordsworth’s poem states that whenever he feels sad, he thinks of the daffodils, which enables him to be happy. Nature, but more accurately the thoughts that nature’s beauty created fill the speaker with rejuvenation and wonder outside of him dull life. In Marlowe’s poem the natural world serves to distract from the dissatisfaction that is felt toward modern society. The shepherd wishes for his lover to experience a naturalistic environment filled with modernistic objects; he wishes to combine the best of the modern and natural world. The overwhelming beauty of nature naively blinds him, thus making his plea seem unreasonable rather than ideal.…

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The poem starts off on a melancholic tone; the opening sentence being ‘I wondered lonely as a cloud’. Instantly readers get the mental image of the lonely romantic, outside the rest of humanity as a cloud floats above the landscape. The tone of the poem shifts dramatically once Wordsworth comes across the daffodils. The daffodils bring him an overwhelming joy, and this remains the dominant mood of the poem. “A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company”.…

    • 1267 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The novel is a meditation on existence as seen through the medium of imaginary characters”(41). In TULB, Kundera confronts many dichotomies and recognizes the many layers of human development, as well as the intricate ambiguities that form the foundation of ambiguity and contradiction that complete the human identity. The whole novel takes a direct position in responding to Nietzsche and Parmenides as it deals with these themes and highlights the human struggle to find identity and individually amongst all of the conflicting forces. He makes it clear that while there is no definitive notions that define an entity, whether that be an individual or a society, there is a way to bring meaning to life and, therefore happiness. While repeating a decision is impossible does nutmeat Nietzsche’s eternal return is correct.…

    • 1897 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Moreover, the tone establishes a sense of respect Blake possesses toward nature and the power it harnesses. In the poem’s final line, Blake describes creating Jerusalem, “In England’s green and pleasant land” (Blake 16). Blake is referring to his mental mission of rebuilding the once mighty natural world of England, from the frayed lands that harbor the industrialized world. A commonality of Romantic poetry, the desire to maintain the gracefulness of nature’s power is represented here by Blake’s will to place a shrine to heaven on top of it. Blake’s phenomenal use of imagery is utilized to virtually beg readers to halt progress and simply sit back and enjoy the beauty the world has to offer.…

    • 993 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The teachings of the poems hint towards preserving natures wondrous beings, even the season is described with anthropomorphism. The Caterpillar in particular educates as ethics are mentioned. The Humble Bee is implored by Emerson to tech him the ways of the wise, while Keats only needs to exhibit enchanting and realistic images and sounds to inform the reader how beautiful and brave the season of fall is. All three poems educate, inspire, and change…

    • 758 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Romanticism

    • 1036 Words
    • 4 Pages

    However, since Shelley abhorred the realistic materialism, he put his desire into his poetry and used these innocent and pure natural metaphors to foreshadow his aversion to the reality and his fervent adoration to the nature. In To a Skylark, “ ‘Skylark-Image’ belongs to Shelley’s realm of fabulation, where to be ‘helplessly excited by one thing at a time’ and to vanish from sight is a good thing, the source and point of vitality. ‘To a Skylark,’ that textual ‘Scorner of ground,’ ...casting off the world of ‘profitable relations between two things.’ ” (Pyle, Forest) The skylark was such a purified metaphor that it implied the desire of Shelley’s deep heart. Skylarks, always considered as the most innocent symbol, are birds of daylight which indicates that they are departed from darkness. Shelley was inspired by skylarks and he implied his joyness of feeling painless from skylarks into the poem.…

    • 1036 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    This poem describes his insistence upon the realism and objectivity. “Come In” shows a theme of nature in which it is admiring the magnificence and minimalism of natural elements but it leads us into wisdom and meaning. The poem is about the contrast of nature as well as the general darker and lighter side of life into a further theoretical level. The fourth line of the poem “Come In” says, “Far in the pillared dark Thrush music went almost like a call to come in to the dark and lament”. Robert Frost mentions the fourth stanza as a qualification for the calling of the woods, and he also never say that there was an invitation.…

    • 1292 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Poem Analysis: Dover Beach

    • 1040 Words
    • 5 Pages

    He explores this contradiction through what is possibly the poem's most famous stanza, that which compares his experience to that of Sophocles. The comparison could be lacking originality, if the point were merely that someone long before had appreciated the same type of beauty that he does. However, it is saddening because it reveals a darker potential in the world's natural beauty. What natural beauty reminds us of is human misery. We are aware of the beauty in nature, but can never quite go beyond the limits of our…

    • 1040 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Enlightenment masterpieces like Candide lay out the rules of life and nature and how one should be. Thoreau says “I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life” (74). This is a popular passage because it reveals such reasoning behind his rambling, poetic journal. Thoreau’s point is that “to live deliberately” is not necessarily to go to the woods. His phrasing requires emphasis: I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately.…

    • 1360 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays