The History Of Racism In The United States

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Racism in the United States dating as far back as the 1800s, we are still dealing with racism in our world today. Some of the most recent stories in the news that are about racism are the police shooting Trayvon Martin, the Oklahoma university fraternity saying a racial phrase, and many other police related racism scandals. One of the most well known racist groups in america is the Ku Klux Klan, they had three main Ku Klux Klan groups the first happened in the late 1860s.(Spartacus Educational, 1997)
At the end of the American Civil War members of congress wanted to take away white power southern states. The first of the three branches of the Ku Klux Klan was established in Tennessee most of the leaders of this klan had been members of the
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Jim Crow was a popular show performed by a white actor who made fun of African Americans. The frace “Jim Crow Law” came to be used to describe segregation in the south. Signs told African Americans where they could and could not go, the signs separated things such a restraunts, bathrooms, and water fountains. (Racism in the 1920s & 1930s, 2001)
Another form of racism in the 20’s known for race riots, during the summer of 1919 there were a total of twenty-six riots. In chicago there were thirty- eight african americans killed and five hundred injured. One of the most famous race riots happened in Tulsa Oklahoma in 1921. A white elevator operator claimed that a black man had attacked her, the african american man was arrested. White residents set black peoples homes on fire and damaged businesses ran by African Americans. There was a total of thirty- five city blocks and more than 6,000 blacks were arrested. (Racism in the 1920s & 1930s,
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The civil rights movement was the reason for the third wave of the Ku Klux Klan. (The Ku Klux Klan, and Brief Biography, 1999)
The Ku Klux Klan was against Africans americans having the right to vote, and having black and white children attend the same school. This resulted in the same activities such as lynching, burning, and everything that took place in the 1920s all over again. Throughout the 1960s African Americans were becoming impatient with the slow movement of the laws around them, they decided they could not wait for laws they had to make them happen themselves. (The Ku Klux Klan, and Brief Biography, 1999)
There has been racism dating back as far as anyone can remember, as much as people do not like to admit it racism is still around today. Not as bad as it was 100 years ago but everyone does not still have equal rights. Not only between blacks and whites but also between men and women. The 1920s were a dark time for american history because of the terrible racist world that they had to live in. (The Ku Klux Klan, and Brief Biography, 1999) (The Rise of the United Klans of America, 2001) (Racism in the 1920s & 1930s,

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