Without Knowledge At All Analysis

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Knowledge cannot be illustrated with one straightforward definition and in consequence, there are innumerable ways of receiving it. From day one of our lives, we are obtaining knowledge from our own experiences and the experiences of those close to us. Knowledge is obtained not only from the facts in a textbook but from the senses we are born with. It is not simply one or the other but is a jumbled up stew of education and experiences that creates the knowledge one knows today. And when we explore the assertion “Without knowledge of the past, we would have no knowledge at all” the flaws of the statement can be seen when one understands the different ways of collecting knowledge. Although many argue that knowledge of the past is knowledge itself, …show more content…
The knowledge that is learned from dead aristocrats or from parents and close friends. Yet this statement fails to distinguish the knowledge we perceive on from everyday lives. As well as the knowledge that reflects our own mental state, that controls our thoughts and feelings. It also disregards prior knowledge that is in a result of non-experiential knowledge, which depends on things such as logic. So this assertion can only be partly correct, for it is right in conveying the importance of looking to the past and learning from it. When exploring other cultures and their perspective of knowledge, it is seen that obtain knowledge is primarily gained from the stories of their ancestors. For example, the Sioux legends and mythology played an important role in their traditions and the way they rationalize the world around them. The Sioux had a respect for ancient wisdom and in resultant places the knowledge, they learned from their leaders above those they experience. Yet past knowledge can not be defined as our only knowledge because, the knowledge we obtain from the past only adds and enhances

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