Kingston And Anne Moody Analysis

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Maxine Hong Kingston and Anne Moody wrote classic pieces of literature that helped shed light on various struggles women in America dealt with. While their written pieces cover two different stories it can be said that some of the struggles they faced had distinct similarities. The two women had different experiences growing up, one was a first-generation American while the other was in a lower income and racial class. Kingston and Moody both utilize their writing platform to discuss the oppression they had faced in their life. Both women rebel against these varying oppressive forces in different ways. As previously discussed both Kingston and Moody faced prejudice. They experienced these acts of oppression from the white people in their lives, …show more content…
Kingston and Moody both faced hardship from those closest to them and those that believed they were better. Moody was a part of the Civil Rights Movement and had to face racism for the bulk of her life. She was belittled when she innocently said she would be willing to get an education at a desegregated school. Moody’s own mother begged her not to become involved in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Kingston too felt the forces of oppression because she was not white. But she also was not accepted by the Chinese because she was born in America. Kingston’s mother attempted to oppress her because she was a woman and Brave Orchid was wanting to stick to traditional Chinese cultural roles. Kingston and Moody both utilized the power of the written word to make advancements for themselves and those that were affected by racism and oppression. Kingston risked a lot by writing her autobiography. She went against everything she was ever taught by divulging the story of the No Name Woman. But she able to give a voice to so many that were bound by their culture and family. Moody used both her autobiography to give a voice to other African American and her involvement in activism. Her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement led to some of the most well-known protests. She was involved in the Woolworth’s sit-ins and her picture is printed in almost every single American history textbook. But her autobiography, Coming of Age in Mississippi, gives a more in-depth and personal look at the struggles she and other women of color had to face at any given time. Her piece of writing is able to shed so much light on the adversity African American’s faced. Even though Maxine Hong Kingston and Anne Moody did not take the exact same route to express their opinions, they were both able to provide voices for those that had been denied one for so

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