King Salmon's Disappearance

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The fourth and final theory that I will be explaining deals with worldwide climate change. Global climate change is a hot button issue for many political and special interest groups and some scientists believe that it may be at the root of the King Salmon’s disappearance. Despite its relative sensitivity, when compared to other theories about the salmon crisis, it is accepted by almost all that it is a happening. Regardless of what side of the political aisle you fall on, it is simply factual that the climate is changing. The causes are typically the cause of the debate surrounding it, but I will leave that argument to those who are more knowledgeable about it than I am. The last fifty years or so have seen the climate warm up and it has …show more content…
In the Artic-Yukon-Kuskokwim Research Action Plan scientists write that “Changes to the marine environment experienced by AYK Chinook salmon upon entry to the marine environment and during the early period of the marine portion of their life cycle are certainly a plausible explanation for their decline in recent years” (Schindler et al.). Additionally, the prey of the salmon may be experiencing similar effects, and perhaps the climate change has caused significantly less habitable options for the crustaceans, amphipods, and smaller fish that make up the majority of the Chinook diet. A potential disappearance in prey may be the reason why the other salmon populations in the region remain strong, as Kings inhabit more northern environments in the ocean and eat prey on different organisms as a result. Furthermore, like the Northern Pike theory, the timeline also matches up with the disappearance of the Chinooks, with some small effects happening in the late twentieth century and increasing more and more into the twenty first. The main hole in the argument is the extreme complexity of the global currents and populations, which could have been affected. It is easy to see that the climate change could have caused the Chinook crisis, but it is very hard to …show more content…
The theories range from global climate change patterns to too many people dipping their setnets into the rivers. However, what we do know – conclusively – is that this problem is very real, and each day nothing is changed the problem persists, continuing to eat away at vibrant culture and economy. As biologists and researchers pry open the doors behind which the solution hides, the fishermen and small business owners of the several Alaskan communities that depend on this fish await with baited breath. Hoping to find that there is an answer, hoping that they will see the salmon return to color the Copper River red once more, hoping that all is not

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