King One Name To Rule Them All Analysis

Improved Essays
One Name to Rule them All As individuals are being born in the United States, one does not recognize how much damaged our people have done to others. In the chapter "One name to rule them all", King illustrates the history of the Indian and white conquering their land while taking control of their lives. Meanwhile, King analysis and states that why didn’t we just kill all the Indians off and never give them a chance to become civilized people in our country. Therefore, King argues that the Indians were being placed and relocating because the government owned their land. Unfortunately, the government itself pressured the Natives to move along the Canadian border and constructed an act that would organize the lives of the Indian. For instance, …show more content…
For instance, King elaborated that when one takes land or anything away from somebody legally it is no longer called stealing, he stated "... I have to concede that if theft is legally sanctioned, it is no longer theft" (King 97). No one should have to relocate or start a whole new life somewhere else just because the government or one is demanding you to. Therefore, I do not understand why the Indians did not stand up for their environment, for their home that has been created the people that they were. However, Indians did not have the materials or the people to overcome the authority that was removing them from their home. In addition, King also analysis that the Indians were being relocated to several locations because of the Industrial project that the country was starting to grow. Certainly, this began hurting the Indians habits because they would be hunting and fishing for their resources as needed. So, for the government it became “removals and relocations” for the Indian, which continue to steal the land and environment from the Indians. Indeed, I do not agree with King decision making on talking about the removal of Indians because the misfortune that the Indians had to adapt to and keep changing every time the government decided to do something new in their environment. Overall, I believe in giving opportunities to people and giving a hand to those that are in need of it. For instance, if the US could have contribute the land that the Native owned then that would have been something extraordinary and interesting to have discovered. On the other hand, the Natives would have been allies with the US instead of enemies because we did throw them out of their own

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The Cheyenne Native American Dull Knife once said, “All we ask for is to live and live in peace” (332). The quote exemplifies the relationship between the Native Americans and the United States government. The Native Americans did not agree with the American settlers coming into their territory and using their beloved natural resources. As more policies were enacted and more settlers came into the unsettled territories inhabited by the Native Americans, the more likely a violent dispute between the two sides would occur. The more Americans that began to settle in Native American territories, the more likely the United States government would uproot the Indians from their native lands.…

    • 789 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They needed to adjust their culture and fight for their land. As some accepted the changes others didn’t and were ridiculed by Americans for showing their culture. Whole tribes were even killed . Impacts on Native Americans were many different things. These are only some of the big effects the western expansion had on the Native Americans.…

    • 666 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Great Awakening Dbq

    • 1208 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Even though there were eventually put down they were successful in getting the English to sign the Proclamation of 1763 which declared certain regions off limits to colonizers. However, as you would expect, the colonists did not abide by the treaty which would culminate into more tensions in between the Natives and the colonists. Overall, French and Indian war resulted in more social tension between the Natives and the colonists due to more settlers coming over to replace the defeated the French leading to more land being taken from the…

    • 1208 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The land from the Louisiana Purchase was just recently acquired and citizens wanted to extend the nation from sea to shining sea. This is a dangerous thought process. Instead of biting off more than it can chew, America should focus on governing and maintaining the land they just got, instead of trying to get even more. After recovering from the War of 1812, the United States should try to keep peaceful relations with the natives. By taking their land, there will be obvious backlash from the natives, which will cost American deaths and money.…

    • 2378 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Chelsea Engel Mr. Johnson HIST170-85086 14 October 2016 Moral and Legal Components of Indian Removal While considering different moral and legal viewpoints, my question is: when is it okay for a new, power-hungry nation to come to a continent and take over the land and people that were already there? People such as Andrew Jackson and Francis J. Grund thought the Natives of the land they were taking over didn’t have a legal right or sentimental tie to the land. However, John Ross and William Penn argued that the Native Americans were not only guaranteed the land by treaties signed by Congress, but the land had been passed down from many generations and the whites had no right to take it. Although both sides of the argument agreed that Indians…

    • 1088 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    During the Nineteenth Century, western expansion was erupting in America, and federal policy decided that certain tribes had to be confined to fixed land plots to continue their traditional lifestyles. American Indians were being forced off of their lands, and they were not adjusting well. Federal policy was trying to Americanize the “savage” indians so that they could be introduced into American society. American Indians were sent to live on small areas of land within a group’s territory that was reserved exclusively for their use, or reservations. Native Americans retaliated against the American government wanting to relocate them due to it’s former policy of treating the much of the west as Indian preserved territory.…

    • 283 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Native Americans at the end of this war, saw their entire world change, they had gone from the most powerful in the Eastern Regions to now isolated into the North Western Regions. In hope that the American and the White settlers would not eradicate them completely. Native Americans, though playing a major role in the British side were not at fault, Native American tribes were able to rally to war under the leadership of Tecumseh, but after his death the Indian Tribe Nation crumbled and failed. Tribes began practicing again their isolationist…

    • 1417 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Slowly, the Quiet Revolution turned into the Québec questions with English-speaking Canadians all over the nation asking, “What does Québec want?” Québec’s main goal was to crush English dominance, and separatists such as René Lévesque viewed full independence as the only solution. The government inspired hopes of change in many different groups of the population such as students, youngsters, middle-class people, and business people. At this point, the criticism, inspired by the Quiet Revolution, was turning from an internal self-examination to an analysis of the external factors that gave French Canadians their inferior status. The English-speaking Canadians and the French-speaking Canadians in Québec were developing an antagonist attitude towards each other. This is why the revolution was called quiet; it was primarily non-violent.…

    • 1755 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Whether the Indians vanished it wasn’t a choice to adapt to the modern ways, it was more of a possessive way of pushing them out. Their tribes meant everything to them trying to remain independent they did not feel necessary to get comfortable with the modern ways and to stick by their own beliefs. The “vanishing Indian” was not true due to the fact that we kept pushing them west. There was no way for them to vanish because of our constant desire of land. The source from Touring Indian country 1888 and 1894 talks about the “few indians” that live in such land and the Indians are now indulged into “agricultural and industrial pursuits” this land has a garden which had no real guidance for the Indian culture.…

    • 939 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Most of what Americans know about Native Americans and their culture back then comes from distorted information and thus they believed that the natives were either a dying race or an obstacle in their path. In order to prevent more misfortune from happening again the government needs to learn how to put their foot down and control their people, inform them that just because a group of people live a different life and live on better land than they do does not permit them to freely break established…

    • 1386 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays