Foolishness In Hamlet

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In King Lear, written in 1606, Shakespeare’s stylistic devices convey not only a feeling of bitter despondency and disheartened despair, but also a feeling of desolate hopelessness and tormented delusion to reveal the misery and turmoil that results from betrayal brought on by severed holy chords. The use of diction evokes a feeling of fury as the brutality of the words echo the physical and emotional suffering induced by both literal and metaphorical maelstroms. Provoked by the “contentious storm,” the unmercifulness of the “roaring sea” conveys the severity of attacks upon the body and soul. Specifically, the word “contentious” contributes to the power of the tempest by depicting the storm as one with the magnitude of a tornado or hurricane. Similar to a storm in nature, the “tempest in [the] mind” results from the breaking of familial bonds and encompasses all the wrath induced by …show more content…
For example, the abominable actions of men prompt the question “Is man no more than this?” which leads to the unmistakable conclusion that “nothing comes from nothing.” Likewise, foolish actions lead to foolish consequences and wise actions lead to wise consequences. Similarly in Shakespeare’s Hamlet, the protagonist ….. . While hardships and difficult experiences produce wisdom, the question “Who can tell me who I am?” reveals a yearning desire for wisdom and discernment; however, the actions of man “know themselves” and _________. A craving for knowledge and judgment uncover the true intentions of the heart against the evil actions of fellow men. When the acceptance of reality supersedes self-pity, a man may be “more sinned against that sinning,” yet eventually, the wicked will receive the “cup of their deservings.” Furthermore in Shakespeare’s Macbeth, ___________. Wisdom gained through hardship outweighs the value of greatest

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