Essay on Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

1348 Words Oct 27th, 2015 6 Pages
To Kill A Mockingbird Contrary to popular belief, racism is still well alive in the United States, even in the 21st century. Many attempts have been made to terminate the unwanted social injustice, but its presence is still plainly evident today. Still, there have been many citizens who have become blind to racism. Despite slavery being abolished, and segregation outlawed, racism still exists. A minority in the United States would easily be able to explain in detail the evident facts of racism today, while most white persons will tell you that the country has reached racial equality. Sadly, this is not the case in America today. There are many literary examples that give different perspectives on racism over the course of the 18th and 20th centuries. One of the most noteworthy novels, To Kill A Mockingbird, was written in 1960 by author Harper Lee. The novel was released during the Civil Right’s Movement, and Lee makes the racism plain to see. In the novel a black man named Tom Robinson is accused of raping a white girl, and is defended by a white lawyer named Atticus Finch. Atticus is an honest and hardworking man who loves his children very much, and believes that in spite of being a negro, Tom Robinson deserves a lawyer that will defend him fairly. While Atticus does a very good job, and displays plain evidence that proves Tom Robinson innocent, the jury of white citizens declares him guilty. The novel is only fictional of course, and none of the events really occurred.…

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