Confucianism Influence

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Confucianism, dating back from the Spring and Autumn period (551-479 BCE), began its impact by a man named Confucius (Kong Fuzi). The main idea of Confucianism spread very quickly during the Zhou period, but was then hampered in the Warring State and in the Qin Dynasty when Legalism became the most prominent study. Furthermore, during the Qin Dynasty, the Confucius philosophers and books were killed and destroyed. However, Confucianism reached another peak during the Han dynasty; the government officials were mainly under the influence of Confucianism as the test were based on Confucianism’s writing (Yao 55). The Confucius philosophy was later take over by Daoism or Buddhism; still, Confucianism remains part of the long Chinese history until now (Yao 55), Confucianism focus on mainly on personalities, the study of Humanness (Ren), righteousness (yi), filial piety (xiao), and loyalty (xin) were core roots of Confucianism. With all four beliefs, Confucianism is a …show more content…
However, in the modern era, the old Confucianism idea began to fade away as we value other beliefs more heavily. For instance, we may snitch on our parents when they have done something wrong; instead of following the Confucius idea of protecting them and providing them the best. As we see how the idea of Confucianism contradicts our modern era phenomenal, we believe there are pros and cons on each philosophy. Moreover, learning and practicing different kinds of philosophy will grant a better view of the world. All in all, Confucianism is one of the most historical piece of philosophy, and learning the five main concepts of Confucianism, we understand how each belief and ritual are linked together, and without anyone of these, we fail to obtain any of those because they are so closely

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