Ken Robinson's Speech: Do Schools Kill Creativity?

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Once in our high school life have we wondered why we cram up the definitions of sin, cos or the theories that lead to Newton’s law. Once in our high school life have we been asked what majors we are fond of, as well as received harsh exclamations from people who declare our intentions as impractical. Once in our high school life have we been barred from enrolling in a creative art class since we are inclined to acquire a mastery of “top classes” which involve mathematics and science-related fields. We have all struggled through these issues and even have gone as far as to hesitate to insert people’s thoughts into ours. Contextualized in this puzzling and questionable situation, Ken Robinson partnered with Ted Talk to conduct a speech called …show more content…
Having chosen the right moment to present his speech, following the President Bush’s “No Child Left Behind” Act in 2006 and a breakthrough of technology and beyond, Robinson approaches the significant matter of education by first confessing his particular interest in it. Then, he smoothly shifts his emphasis towards creativity in schools, concentrating on the experiences he has had globally. Lastly, in comparison with creativity in younger kids, he subsequently points out school systems’ failure to foster and nurture inventiveness in favor of more subjects and addresses the detrimental “hierarchy” of the public system. From his perspective as an educationalist, Robinson enters this awareness vigorously without deteriorating the structure of public schools by the use of appropriate appeals of …show more content…
In his opinion, kids at younger age tend to inquire themselves into a pool of experiences. For example, his son, James, awed us by his excitement to participate minimally in so popular a play. This encounter leads to the idea that “kids will take a chance.”, unlike young adults who are raised to “become frightened of being wrong.” Additionally, the process of schooling constructs people “progressively from the waist up. And then we focus on their heads. And slightly to one side.” In making this comment, Robinson urges us to conjecture that teaching concentrates on developing a particular distinction in only one specific field. The statement above is advocated by his exposure to an innermost anecdote from the majority of academic conferences in which he claims, “And there, you will see it. Grown men and women writhing uncontrollably, off the beat.” This piece not only depicts a witty scene, but it also reveals a detrimental influence on “senior academics,” who see themselves lacking a capability to dance- a vital and fundamental skill to own. These two examples, in a nutshell, astoundingly affirm the old-fashioned methods of schooling which inevitably leads to “a disability in multiple parts of our

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