Karl Marx And Sigmund Freud: Wishful Thinking Of An Afterlife

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Despite Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud’s individualistic ideas and definitions of religion, they obtain a common understanding regarding wishful thinking of an afterlife. However, the way they interpret the afterlife is different. Karl Marx argued that the idea of an afterlife is able to dull the pain of reality; he uses religion to shed some light on how bad living life truly is. On the other hand, Freud believes that all religious believes are just illusions and wishful thinking is the ultimate cry for help. Freud believes society should grow up and deal with the life presented in front of the individual. Karl Marx wrote during a time that it was considered lucky to have a job regardless of how atrocious the conditions. For the most part, his …show more content…
Freud was a psychologist who developed the theory of psychodynamics in which he studied neurotic and psychotic people. Pertaining to the relevance of his beliefs about religion, his studies included those who are and who are not in touch with reality. Freud focused his studies on how each individual’s childhood has shaped their life. “Religious ideas are teaching and assertions about facts and conditions of external (or internal) reality which tell one something one has not discovered for oneself and which lay claim to one’s belief” (Freud). Those who teach are most likely the parent, whom the child looks up to. The Oedipus Complex is the notion of the male child desiring their mother and fearing their father. Religion provides a setting where the child is able to address their fears through wish-fulfillment. This outlet allows an individual to reveal how they really feel in a “secure” context. However, this context is not actually secure and Freud thinks religion will not help, therefore, individuals should deal with their problems …show more content…
The episode begins with Stan Marsh and his friends wanting to beat up the new kid, Gary. However, when Stan went to beat him up, Gary was surprisingly nice and invited Stan over for dinner. The rest of Stan’s friends were intolerable, which portrays their views on religion. Gary and his family were stereotyped as “perfect”. The family was converted to Mormonism before moving into Stan’s town. Throughout the night the family reads about their religion. At first Stan was intrigued, but quickly grew skeptical. His father, Randy, was willing to immediately convert as well. Eventually, Stan simply called every Mormon gullible for believing the unreasonable myths of the traditional story how their religion was originated. The audience also recognizes the ambiguous story that the Harrison’s tell. The use of satire continued to make the audience wonder or question the validity of Mormonism throughout the

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