Karl Marx And Sigmund Freud Comparison

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Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud came from two different eras as well as two different modes of thinking. At first, Marx and Freud to be taken together in academic field seem to be inappropriate. Marx concerns himself to the society, on how to free man from the alienation brought about by the capitalism. Freud concerns himself on the workings of the mind on the root cause of why man is acting this way and that way. The endeavor to put the two different fields of study in a nutshell and put them in the same circle would appear to be a futile effort because it would mean to break the importance of the ideas of each scholar. However, no matter how much their ideas differ, there are some ideas that are parallel with each other that should be studied. …show more content…
Sigmund Freud’s theory of the unconscious and his method, psychoanalysis are a manifestation of revolution against the psychology of his time. And, Karl Marx’s ideas are also in contrary to the perception of society of the pre-Marxist era. Both philosophers have a common ground of thinking from which their thinking grows which can be summarized in three statements: (1) of all one must doubt (omnibus est dubitandum); (2) I believe nothing human to be alien to me (nihil humanum a mihi alienum puto); (3) the truth shall make you free. The first statement corresponds to the general mood of the modern era, to doubt all things that the senses perceive the hearsay, and the beliefs of the ancient and medieval time. All of the things that were assumed as true are all put to subjection for doubt. However, Marx and Freud are of the different thread of thinking. The doubt that both philosophers are referring to are to man’s thoughts about himself and about others. Marx thought that all that man thought about himself and about others is just an illusion, in which he coined, “ideology.” It is based on what seems to appear on the surface and thus, concealing the essence of the society. He remarks that the thinking of a person is influenced by the structure of his society. In this approach, Freud is similar to Marx his whole psychoanalytic method is dubbed as “an art of doubting ” because through the duration of Freud’s treatment to his patients he founds out that what corresponds to reality to is not what is conscious. He believes that man lives with illusions. Illusions make the miseries of reality to be much bearable to

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